School Age

Viola Desmond Won't Be Budged. Jody Nyasha Warner & Richard Rudnicki, $18.95

In Nova Scotia, in 1946, an usher in a movie theatre told Viola Desmond to move from her main floor seat up to the balcony. She refused to budge. Viola knew she was being asked to move because she was black. After all, she was the only black person downstairs. All the other black people were up in the balcony. In no time at all, the police arrived and took Viola to jail. The next day she was charged and fined, but she vowed to continue her struggle against such unfair rules. She refused to accept that being black meant she couldn't sit where she wanted.

Viola's determination gave strength and inspiration to her community at the time. She is an unsung hero of the North American struggle against injustice and racial discrimination whose story deserves to be widely known.


Short Stories for Little Monsters. Marie-Luoise Gay, $19.95

What do cats really see? What do trees talk about? Should you make funny faces on a windy day? Do worms rule the world? Do mothers always tell the truth? Do snails have nightmares? This hilarious collection of illustrated stories gives us a glimpse into the things children wonder about every day.


Where Will I Live? Rosemary McCarney, $19.95

Every child needs a home. They need somewhere safe where they can be happy, eat their meals with their family, play with their toys, and go to sleep at night feeling unafraid. But many children all over the world have had to leave their homes because they are no longer safe. Because of war and conflict, they and their families have become refugees. For them life is hard and full of questions. In spite of everything, they find time to laugh, play, and make friends. And most importantly, they have hope that somewhere, someone will welcome them to a new home.

Written by Rosemary McCarney, Canada's Ambassador to the United Nations, Where Will I Live? will help children whose lives are not directly affected by this crisis think about the importance of home, and what life is like for a child refugee who does not have a permanent, safe home to shelter them and their family. The beautiful photographs in this book were taken by the UNHCR — the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees — and include images of children on the move and in refugee camps in countries such as Lebanon, Rwanda, Iraq, Niger, Hungary, Jordan, South Sudan, and Greece.


An Inuksuk Means Welcome. Mary Wallace, $18.95

An inuksuk is a stone landmark that different peoples of the Arctic region build to leave a symbolic message. Inuksuit (the plural of inuksuk) can point the way, express joy, or simply say: welcome. A central image in Inuit culture, the inuksuk frames this picture book as an acrostic: readers will learn seven words from the Inuktitut language whose first letters together spell INUKSUK. Each word is presented in English and in Inuktitut characters, with phonetic pronunciation guides provided.

The words and their definitions give a sense of the traditions and customs of Inuit life in the Arctic: nanuq is the powerful polar bear of the north; kamik is a warm seal- and caribou-skin boot; and siku is sea ice. Stunning paintings with deep color and rich texture evoke a powerful sense of place and show great respect for the Arctic's indigenous people. Extra informational text features include an introductory note about the significance of inuksuit in Inuit culture and a nonfiction page that profiles seven different types of inuksuit.


In the Red Canoe. Leslie Davidson & Laura Bifano, $19.95

Ducks and frogs, swallows and dragonflies, beaver lodges and lily pads — a multitude of wonders enchant the child narrator in this tender, beautifully illustrated picture book. A tribute to those fragile, wild places that still exist, In the Red Canoe celebrates the bond between grandparent and grandchild and invites nature lovers of all ages along for the ride.


Cinderstella: a Tale of Planets Not Princes. Susan Sweet & Brenda Myles, illustrated by Valeria Docampo, $20.95

Cinderstella has plans for her own happily ever after. A future princess she is not. Her calculations and equations are simple enough — she'd rather be an astronaut!

Read along in this modern retelling of a beloved fairy tale, as Cinderstella challenges what is expected of her to pursue her true passion and find a universe of opportunity in planets and stars.


The Matatu. Eric Walters, illustrations by Eva Campbell, $10.95

Kioko has been watching the matatus come and go for as long as he can remember. On his fifth birthday, he gets the chance to climb aboard one with his grandfather. As the matatu pulls away from the market, several village dogs chase after it. Kioko wonders why the dogs always bark and chase after matatus. When he asks his grandfather about it, his grandfather tells Kioko an entertaining tale about a dog, a goat and a sheep. Set in East Africa and inspired by a Kamba folktale, The Matatu is a colorful story filled with unexpected twists and turns.


Henrietta. Lucy Rose, illustrated by Shawna Lee Campbell, $16.00

Henrietta is a modest and whimsical story about that crucial moment in childhood, when reality collides with fantasy. As Henrietta is growing older, she begins to lose faith in magic. With the help of Finnius and his friends, a magical pod of flying dolphins, Henrietta realizes that magic can still exist when you are older. While magic can always be found in the nooks and crannies of your imagination, you can also find it by travelling the world and seeking adventures. Embark on a magical adventure and travel the universe with Henrietta, Finnius and friends.


The Moccasin Goalie. William Roy Brownridge, $10.95

Danny and his friends, Anita, Petou and Marcel, are typical youngsters — hockey mad. Danny's disability means that he can’t wear skates, but his leather moccasins work just fine and earn him the name “Moccasin Danny.” When a town team is formed, the friends are overjoyed, but only Marcel is picked for the team. Will Danny get the chance to prove that even though he can’t wear a pair of skates, he can still play the game?


Stepping Stones: a Refugee Family's Journey. Margaret Ruurs, illustrated by Nizar Ali Badr, $20.00

Stepping Stones tells the story of Rama and her family, who are forced to flee their once-peaceful village to escape the ravages of the civil war raging ever closer to their home. With only what they can carry on their backs, Rama and her mother, father, grandfather and brother, Sami, set out to walk to freedom in Europe. Nizar Ali Badr’s stunning stone images illustrate the story.


The Darkest Dark. Chris Hadfield & Kate Fillion, Illustrated by Eric Fan & Terry Fan, $22.99

Chris loves rockets and planets and pretending he's a brave astronaut, exploring the universe. Only one problem — at night, Chris doesn't feel so brave. He's afraid of the dark. But when he watches the groundbreaking moon landing on TV, he realizes that space is the darkest dark there is — and the dark is beautiful and exciting, especially when you have big dreams to keep you company.

Inspired by the childhood of real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield and brought to life by Terry and Eric Fan's lush, evocative illustrations, The Darkest Dark will encourage readers to dream the impossible.


French Toast. Kari-Lynn Winters, illustrated by François Thisdale, $19.95

Phoebe — half Jamaican, half French-Canadian — hates her school nickname of “French Toast.” So she is mortified when, out on a walk with her Jamaican grandmother, she hears a classmate shout it out at her. To make things worse, Nan-Ma, who is blind, wants an explanation of the name. How can Phoebe describe the colour of her skin to someone who has never seen it? “Like tea, after you’ve added the milk,” she says. And her father? “Like warm banana bread.” And Nan-Ma herself? She is like maple syrup poured over... well ...

In French Toast, Kari-Lynn Winters uses descriptions of favourite foods from both of Phoebe’s cultures to celebrate the varied skin tones of her family. François Thisdale’s imaginative illustrations fill the landscape with whimsy and mouthwatering delight as Phoebe realizes her own resilience and takes ownership of her nickname proudly.


Adrift at Sea: a Vietnamese Boy's Story of Survival. Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch, with Tuan Ho, Illustrated by Brian Deines, $22.95

It is 1981. In the middle of the South China Sea, a fishing boat overloaded with 60 Vietnamese refugees drifts. The motor has failed; the hull is leaking; the drinking water is nearly gone. This is the dramatic true story recounted by Tuan Ho, who was six years old when he, his mother, and two sisters dodged the bullets of Vietnam’s military police for the perilous chance of boarding that boat. Illustrated with sweeping oil paintings and complete with an expansive historical and biographical section with photographs, this non-fiction picture book is all the more important as the world responds to a new generation of refugees risking all on the open water for the chance at safety and a new life.


The Story of Canada. Janet Lunn & Christopher Moore, Illustrated by Alan Daniel, $39.99

Award-winning writer Janet Lunn and historian Christopher Moore tell our country’s story through rich narrative, recreations of daily life, folk tales and intriguing facts. Coupled with Alan Daniel’s evocative original paintings, as well as dozens of historical photographs, maps, paintings, documents and cartoons, The Story of Canada is as splendid to look at as it is fascinating to read. Includes new material to bring us to the 150th anniversary of Confederation.


Grow! Raise! Catch! How We Get Our Food. Shelley Rotner, $26.50

In a book filled with bright and enticing photographs and an accessible text, Shelley Rotner offers a breakdown of the farm-to-table process that is perfect for preschoolers and kindergarten students.

Who grows our juicy fruits and yummy vegetables? Who raises animals for our tasty eggs, milk and meat? Who catches fresh fish for our table? Farmers and fishermen show off their bounty in this lively look at the people who produce the food on which we all rely.


Lila and the Crow. Gabrielle Grimard, $21.95

Lila has just moved to a new town and can’t wait to make friends at school. But on the first day, a boy points at her and shouts: “A crow! A crow! The new girl’s hair is black like a crow!” Lila’s heart grows as heavy as a stone. The next day, Lila covers her hair. But this time, the boy points at her dark skin. When she covers her face, he mocks her dark eyes. Now every day at school, Lila hides under her turtleneck, dark glasses, and hat. And every day when she goes home, she sees a crow that seems to want to tell her something. Lila ignores the bird and even throws rocks at it, but it won’t go away.

Meanwhile, the great autumn festival is approaching. While the other kids prepare their costumes, Lila is sadder and lonelier than ever. At her lowest point of despair, a magical encounter with the crow opens Lila’s eyes to the beauty of being different, and gives her the courage to proudly embrace her true self.


A Child of Books. Oliver Jeffers & Sam Winston, $22.00

A little girl sails her raft across a sea of words, arriving at the house of a small boy and calling him away on an adventure. Through forests of fairy tales and across mountains of make-believe, the two travel together on a fantastical journey that unlocks the boy’s imagination. Now a lifetime of magic and adventure lies ahead of him... but who will be next?


Six Dots: a Story of Young Louis Braille. Jen Bryant, illustrated by Boris Kulikov, $23.99

Louis Braille was just five years old when he lost his sight. He was a clever boy, determined to live like everyone else, and what he wanted more than anything was to be able to read. Even at the school for the blind in Paris, there were no books for him. And so he invented his own alphabet — a whole new system for writing that could be read by touch. A system so ingenious that it is still used by the blind community today.


The Branch. Mireille Messier, Pierre Pratt, $18.95

When an ice storm snaps a small girl's favorite branch from the tree in her yard, she's crestfallen. The girl's mom says it's just a branch. But not to her! “That was the branch I sat on, jumped from, played under. It was my castle, my spy base, my ship...” Luckily, her neighbor Mr. Frank understands. He says the branch has “potential.” “What's potential?” she asks. “It means it's worth keeping.” And so, with imagination and spirit, and Mr. Frank's guidance and tools, the girl transforms the broken branch into something whole and new, giving it another purpose, and her another place to treasure.


Ada's Ideas: the Story of Ada Lovelace, the World's First Computer Programmer. Fiona Robinson, $21.95

Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron’s “mad” love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics “poetical science.” Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in “programming” his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world’s first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.


Rosie Revere, Engineer. Andrea Beaty, illustrated by David Roberts, $21.95

Rosie may seem quiet during the day, but at night she’s a brilliant inventor of gizmos and gadgets who dreams of becoming a great engineer. When her great-great-aunt Rose (Rosie the Riveter) comes for a visit and mentions her one unfinished goal — to fly — Rosie sets to work building a contraption to make her aunt’s dream come true. But when her contraption doesn’t fly but rather hovers for a moment and then crashes, Rosie deems the invention a failure. On the contrary, Aunt Rose insists that Rosie’s contraption was a raging success: you can only truly fail, she explains, if you quit. Rosie Revere, Engineer is a charming, spirited picture book about believing in yourself and pursuing your dreams


Room on the Broom. Julia Donaldson & Axel Scheffler, $12.99

The witch and her cat fly happily over forests, rivers and mountains on their broomstick until a stormy wind blows away the witch's hat, bow and wand. Luckily, they are retrieved by a dog, a bird and a frog, who are all keen for a ride on the broom. It's a case of the more, the merrier, but the broomstick isn't used to such a heavy load and it's not long before... SNAP! It breaks in two! And with a greedy dragon looking for a snack, the witch's animal pals better think fast!


My Dad Used to Be So Cool. Keith Negley, $26.50

Playful and emotional,  My Dad Used to Be So Cool tells the story of a father who is no longer the cool guy he once was. His son looks wistfully at his dad's crazy times playing in a band, riding a motorcycle, and getting tattoos. Those days may be behind him, but his young son still thinks he's the coolest guy in the world.


Swatch the Girl Who Loves Color. Julia Denos, $21.99

In a place where color ran wild, there lived a girl who was wilder still. Her name was Swatch, and color was her passion. From brave green to in-between gray to rumble-tumble pink... Swatch wanted to collect them all. But colors don’t always like to be tamed!


The Way to School. Rosemary McCarney, with Plan International, $18.95 (ages 6-9)

Minimal text and stunning photographs from around the world describe the remarkable, and often dangerous, journeys children make every day on their way to and from school. No simple school bus picks them up each day, but rather children travel through disaster zones, cross rapids, climb mountains, and maneuver on ziplines daily to get to the classroom. Some of them even carry their desks!

In this beautiful picture book for young readers, every image and spread speaks to the desire for an education and the physical commitment the children make each day as they journey to school.

Proceeds from the sale of this book will be donated to Plan Canada's Because I am a Girl Fund.


Where's the Elephant? Barroux, $20.00

A simple game of hide-and-seek quickly takes a new twist as a growing city encroaches on the jungle the animals call home. A thoughtful introduction to the topic of deforestation and conservation.


Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox. Danielle Daniel, $16.95

In this introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals, young children explain why they identify with different creatures such as a deer, beaver or moose. Delightful illustrations show the children wearing masks representing their chosen animal, while the few lines of text on each page work as a series of simple poems throughout the book.

In a brief note, Métis artist and author Danielle Daniel explains the importance of totem animals in Anishinaabe culture and how they can also act as animal guides for young children seeking to understand themselves and others.


Life Without Nico. Andrea Maturana & Francisco Javier Olea, $18.95

Maia and Nico are best friends. They never get tired of playing together. Unexpectedly, though, Nico and his family have to move far away for a while. Maia is devastated. She makes her way through the dark days, bored and alone. Slowly, things begin to change, and Maia meets an unexpected companion,  makes a new friend — she even discovers a new passion. Her life has become so happy and full, in fact, that she worries there will no longer be enough room for Nico. Of course, when he returns, she discovers there is. As Maia learns, “There is always space in your heart for friendship.”


Toshi's Little Treasures. Nadine Robert, illustrated by Aki, $18.95

In this appealing search-and-find informational picture book, readers join a little boy named Toshi as he and his grandmother explore six of their favorite places — the riverbank, the town, the forest, the country, the park and the beach. At each location, Toshi finds treasures to add to his collection, from a dragonfly wing to a glittery rock to a guitar pick. Best of all, his grandmother always knows what everything is!

Mixing fiction and nonfiction, this book is the perfect resource for life science lessons on habitats and the environment. It encourages observation skills, curiosity and critical thinking — building blocks for studying science. This book would be a terrific inspiration for a trip around the neighborhood in which children can find, identify and draw treasures of their own. It could also be used as a starting point for storytelling, in which children imagine the story of a treasure — Toshi's or their own —  before it was found.


The Dead Bird. Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Christian Robinson, $21.99

One day, some children find a bird lying on its side with its eyes closed and no heartbeat. They are very sorry, so they decide to say good-bye. In the park, they dig a hole for the bird and cover it with warm sweet-ferns and flowers. Finally, they sing sweet songs to send the little bird on its way.

This heartwarming classic picture book by beloved children’s book author Margaret Wise Brown is beautifully re-illustrated for a contemporary audience by the critically acclaimed, award-winning illustrator Christian Robinson.


Going for a Sea Bath. Andrée Poulin & Anne-Claire Delisle, $17.95

Leanne’s bath time is boring. It’s annoying. It’s a pain. Luckily, her father has some excellent, terrific, and spectacular ideas to make it more interesting. He runs down to the sea and brings back one turtle. Then two eels. Then three clown fish. Soon Leanne’s bath time is fun! It’s amusing! It’s exciting! But when the ten octopi arrive, could it be too much of a good thing?


Bloom: a Mud Fairy, an Extraordinary Ordinary Girl, and a Castle in Peril. Doreen Cronin & David Small, $22.99

A glass kingdom is no place for a Mud Fairy. Bloom and her mud fairy magic might be able to turn weeds into flowers and spin sand into glass, but the people of the kingdom ceaselessly complain about the trails of dirt and puddles of mud that seem to follow her every step, and finally they cast her out.

But when the glass castle begins to crack, then cracks some more, the King and Queen in a panic search for the long-banished fairy, but they can’t find Bloom anywhere. Desperate to save their home, they send their meekest, most ordinary subject, a girl named Genevieve, whose sole task until now has been to polish the Queen’s crystal sugar spoon — to coax any worthy fairy to come and save the kingdom. Genevieve finds Bloom exactly where the king and queen failed to see her, and Bloom knows exactly how to save the kingdom. But it will take the two girls working together, along with a mighty dollop of self-confidence — and some very messy hands — to accomplish the extraordinary.


Oscar Lives Next Door: a Story Inspired by Oscar Peterson's Childhood. Bonnie Farmer & Marie LaFrance, $17.95

Long before Oscar Peterson became a virtuoso jazz pianist, he was a boy who loved to play the trumpet. When a bout of childhood tuberculosis weakened his lungs, Oscar could no longer play his beloved instrument. He took up piano and the rest is history: Oscar went on to become an international jazz piano sensation. Oscar Lives Next Door is a fictional story inspired by these facts. The book imagines a next-door neighbor for Oscar named Millie, who gets into mischief with him but also appreciates his talents: Oscar hears music in everything, and Millie calls him a magician for the way he can coax melodies from his trumpet. Millie writes to Oscar during his long stay in the hospital for tuberculosis, and she encourages his earliest notes on the piano.

Set in Oscar’s true childhood neighborhood of St-Henri — now known as Little Burgundy — the book provides a wonderful sense of this 1930s neighborhood where most of Montreal’s Black working class population lived. Detailed digital illustrations make the community’s culture and music almost tangible.

The book concludes with a page of informational text about the author’s own connection to Little Burgundy and a short biography of the jazz legend.


Simple Machines: Wheels, Levers, and Pulleys. David Adler, illustrated by Anna Raff, $27.95

This lively introduction to physics will get kids excited about how simple machines simplify our lives. Kids use simple machines every day without realizing it. Teeth are wedges and so are knives, forks, and thumbtacks. Many toys such as slides, which are inclined planes, and seesaws, which are levers, are also simple machines. Two appealing kids and their comical cat introduce levers, wheels, pulleys, inclined plains, and more, and explain how they work.


The Adventures of Miss Petitfour. Anne Michaels, $21.99 (ages 6-9)

Miss Petitfour enjoys having adventures that are "just the right size — fitting into a single, magical day." She is an expert at baking and eating fancy iced cakes, and her favorite mode of travel is par avion. On windy days, she takes her sixteen cats out for an airing: Minky, Misty, Taffy, Purrsia, Pirate, Mustard, Moutarde, Hemdela, Earring, Grigorovitch, Clasby, Captain Captain, Captain Catkin, Captain Cothespin, Your Shyness and Sizzles. With the aid of her favorite tea party tablecloth as a makeshift balloon, Miss Petitfour and her charges fly over her village, having many little adventures along the way.

Join Miss Petitfour and her equally eccentric felines on five magical outings — a search for marmalade, to a spring jumble sale, on a quest for "birthday cheddar", the retrieval of a lost rare stamp and as they compete in the village's annual Festooning Festival. A whimsical, beautifully illustrated collection of tales that celebrates language, storytelling and small pleasures, especially the edible kind!


The Good Dog. Todd Kessler, illustrated by Jennifer Gray Olson, $22.95

The Good Dog follows the adventures of Tako, a puppy who is adopted by 8 year-old Ricky without his parents’ permission. Mom and dad agree to let Tako stay, under one condition: he must be a good dog and always follow the rules. Tako wants to stay with the family more than anything; but when a competing businessman sets out to secretly sabotage the family’s bakery, the only way Tako can protect them is to break the rules. Ultimately, Tako and Ricky’s family discover small people can accomplish big things and sometimes you have to be a little bit bad to be very good.


Hiawatha and the Peacemaker. Robbie Robertson, illustrated by David Shannon, $23.95

Hiawatha was a strong and articulate Mohawk who was chosen to translate the Peacemaker’s message of unity for the five warring Iroquois nations during the 14th century. This message not only succeeded in uniting the tribes but also forever changed how the Iroquois governed themselves — a blueprint for democracy that would later inspire the authors of the U.S. Constitution.

Born of Mohawk and Cayuga descent, musical icon Robbie Robertson learned the story of Hiawatha and his spiritual guide, the Peacemaker, as part of the Iroquois oral tradition. Now he shares the same gift of storytelling with a new generation. Caldecott Honor–winning illustrator David Shannon brings the journey of Hiawatha and the Peacemaker to life with arresting oil paintings. Together, Robertson and Shannon have crafted a new children’s classic that will both educate and inspire readers of all ages. Includes a CD featuring a new, original song written and performed by Robbie Robertson.


Mayann's Train Ride. Mayann Francis, illustrated by Tamara Thiebaux Heikalo, $19.95

Nine-year-old Mayann Francis and her family are travelling from their home in Cape Breton to New York City by train. Everything is exciting to young Mayann, from the beds that fold down to the stop in Montreal to visit friends. Most exciting of all is the chance to show off her brand new purse.

When the Francis family arrives in big, bustling New York City, Mayann visits with relatives, goes to the zoo, and rides the subway. She even receives a beautiful black doll, something she has never seen before. But one subway ride, she loses her beautiful purse. At first she’s heartbroken, but she just might learn a lesson that makes the whole trip worthwhile.


Penelope Perfect. Shannon Anderson, $14.99

This encouraging story told in cheerful rhyme will speak to kids who deal with perfectionism or other forms of anxiety. The book concludes with tips and information to help parents, teachers, counselors, and other adults foster dialogue with children about overcoming perfectionism and coping when things don’t go according to plan.


Brave as Can Be: a Book of Courage. Jo Witek, $19.95

The life of a toddler can be full of frightening things: the dark, the neighbor’s dog, and thunderstorms, just to name a few. As children get older, they begin to feel braver around these everyday events, but how do they build this newfound confidence? In this lyrical, insightful picture book, an older sister explains to her younger sister all the things she used to be afraid of, along with some tricks to help, whether it’s a special blanket for bedtime or singing during a storm. Now, big sister assures little sister, the fears that once felt as big as a mountain feel as minuscule as a speck of dust.


All My Treasures: a Book of Joy. Jo Witek, illustrated by Christine Roussey, $19.95

When a girl receives a beautiful porcelain box from her grandmother, she immediately wants something special to put inside it. But what could it be? What does she love best? She loves jumping in puddles on rainy days, blowing bubbles in the park, and watching her little sister’s first steps. As it turns out, life’s most precious treasures cannot be contained in a box! With a gentle message about the immateriality of happiness, this story reminds us to take pleasure in everyday moments. The book is beautifully packaged with a sparkly die-cut star on the cover, and flaps throughout reveal hidden surprises.


In My Heart: a Book of Feelings. Jo Witek, illustrated by Christine Roussey, $19.95

Happiness, sadness, bravery, anger, shyness... our hearts can feel so many feelings! Some make us feel as light as a balloon, others as heavy as an elephant. In My Heart explores a full range of emotions, describing how they feel physically, inside. With language that is lyrical but also direct, toddlers will be empowered by this new vocabulary and able to practice articulating and identifying their own emotions. 


Circles of Round. Signe Sturup, $22.95

Despite the odd bump in the road, all the Circles in the town called Round live happy lives. Until, one day, an obtuse stranger comes to visit, with an even stranger machine. Called the Corner Transformer, the stranger boasts that it will give them all a new angle on life, and a better shape, too. All the circles eagerly try it out, but changing from Circles to squares and triangles isn't quite what they expected. Simply yet strikingly illustrated with photos of three-dimensional shapes made of paper, this story is a great way to introduce children to the powers of advertising.  


Awesome Is Everywhere. Neil Pasricha, $21.99

Are you ready? With the simple touch of your fingers go on a stunning interactive journey to see the world as you never have before. Fly through wispy clouds, dive deep into the sparkling ocean, feel wet grains of sand on a hot and sunny beach. You will discover you can fly your mind to anywhere on Earth. And by the time you reach the surprise ending in this unforgettable journey you'll learn that awesome truly is everywhere.


Today is the Day. Eric Walters, illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes, $19.99

Mutanu is excited. As she goes about her chores, she thinks about the day to come and what surprises it might bring. For today is no ordinary day at the orphanage she lives in. Every year, the orphanage honors its newest arrivals by creating a birthday day especially for them. From that moment forward, the orphans have a day that they know is theirs — a day to celebrate, a day to enjoy, a day to remember. And today is the day! 

Based on real children in an orphanage in Kenya, this lovely story shows how something as simple as a birthday, something most of us take for granted, can mean so much in another part of the world.


My Two Blankets. Irena Kobald & Freya Blackwood, $21.99

Cartwheel moves to a new country with her auntie, and everything is strange: the animals, the plants — even the wind. An old blanket gives Cartwheel comfort when she’s sad — and a new blanket just might change her world. This multicultural story of friendship is about leaving home, moving to a foreign and strange place, and finding a new friend. It's a story for all who have experienced change. 


Ketzel, the Cat Who Composed. Leslea Newman, $20.00

Moshe Cotel was a composer who lived in a noisy building on a noisy street in a noisy city. But Moshe didn’t mind. Everything he heard was music to his ears. One day, while out for a walk, he heard a small, sad sound that he’d never heard before. It was a tiny kitten! “Come on, little Ketzel,” Moshe said, “I will take you home and we will make beautiful music together.” And they did — in a most surprising way. Inspired by a true story, Lesléa Newman and Amy June Bates craft an engaging tale of a creative man and the beloved cat who brings unexpected sweet notes his way.


Please, Louise. Toni Morrison & Slade Morrison, $10.99

A library card unlocks a new life for a young girl in this picture book about the power of imagination, from the Nobel Prize–winning author Toni Morrison. 

On one gray afternoon, Louise makes a fateful trip to the library. With the help of a new library card and through the transformative power of books, what started out as a dull day turns into one of surprises, ideas, and fun, fun, fun! 


The Little Book of Big Fears. Monica Arnaldo, $17.95

What are the things that scare you? This curious little collection turns fears into surprisingly delightful moments that can be braved by anyone!


The Specific Ocean. Kyo Maclear & Katty Maurey, $18.95

In this gently told picture book, a young girl is unhappy about having to leave the city for a family vacation on the Pacific Ocean (which she used to call the Specific Ocean). As the days pass, however, she is drawn to spend more time in and near the water, feeling moved by its beauty and rhythms. By the end of the vacation, the girl has grown to love the ocean and now feels reluctant to leave it behind. But as she soon realizes, it doesn't ever have to leave her.


Painted Skies. Carolyn Mallory, illustrated by Amei Zhao, $16.95

Leslie is new to the Arctic, and no one told her there would be so much snow, and so many interesting things to see. Along with her new friend Oolipika, Leslie soon discovers one of the Arctic’s most unique and breathtaking natural wonders, the northern lights.

This contemporary narrative introduces young readers to an Inuit legend about the northern lights, followed by an epilogue that explains the science behind this amazing phenomenon.


A Morning to Polish and Keep. Julie Lawson, illustrated by Sheena Lott, $9.95

When Amy goes fishing and loses her first big catch, the day is spoiled. Or is it? By the end of the day, Amy has a real fish story to tell as well as a lasting memory. A Morning to Polish and Keep is the classic children's picture book set on the beautiful Pacific Coast. It is a story of adventure, togetherness, and, ultimately, the comforting memory of family.


Giving Thanks: a Native American Good Morning Message. Chief Jake Swamp & Erwin Printup, Jr., $13.95

A simple prayer of gratitude to Mother Earth, beautifully illustrated.


I Wish You More. Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld, $19.99

Some books are about a single wish. Some books are about three wishes. The infallible team of Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld have combined their extraordinary talents to create this exuberant book of endless good wishes. Wishes for curiosity and wonder, for friendship and strength, laughter and peace. Whether celebrating life's joyous milestones, sharing words of encouragement, or observing the wonder of everyday moments, this sweet and uplifting book is perfect for wishers of every age.


On the Shoulders of a Giant: an Inuit Folktale. Neil Christopher & Jim Nelson, $16.95

Inukpak was big, even for a giant. He loved to travel across the tundra, striding over the widest rivers and wading through the deepest lakes with ease. He could walk across the Arctic in just a few days. But being so big, and travelling so far, Inukpak was often alone. Until one day, when he came across a little hunter on the tundra. Thinking that the hunter was a little boy, alone on the land, Inukpak decided to adopt him as his son. And so, from the shoulder of one of the biggest giants to ever roam the Arctic, this hunter embarked on a series of adventures only a giant could enjoy!


Rosario's Fig Tree. Charis Wahl, illustrated by Luc Melanson, $18.95

Every spring the little girl who lives next door to Rosario helps him plant vegetables. One spring, Rosario plants a fig tree, which soon bears sweet purple fruit. But when fall comes, he bends it over and buries it in the ground. What kind of magic is Rosario performing? The next spring, on planting day, the little girl and Rosario make holes for tomato plants, push in stakes for beans and plant other vegetables. Then Rosario begins to unearth the buried fig tree. It looks dead, for sure. But one hot sunny day, a fresh green leaf appears.


Toad Weather. Sandra Markle, illustrated by Thomas Gonzalez, $22.95

There's nothing to do on a rainy day — or so Ally thinks. But Mama says she's seen something amazing, so despite Ally's misgivings, she sets out on an adventure with her mother and grandmother. On her journey, she sees all sorts of things: dripping awnings, wet cardboard, splashing cars... but also earthworms, storm drain geysers, and oil slick patterns. And then they turn the corner, just in time to see a big crowd. What's happening?


Music is for Everyone. Jill Barber, illustrated by Sydney Smith, $19.95

Music is for Everyone is sure to get you excited about making music! Singer-songwriter Jill Barber takes her young readers through many different kinds of music — hip hop, jazz, classical, folk — and instruments in an energetic, rhyming tour. Sydney Smith’s gleeful illustrations capture all the joy that comes from making music — in all its forms!


In a Cloud of Dust.  Alma Fullerton, illustrated by Brian Deines, $10.95

In a Tanzanian village school, Anna struggles to keep up. Her walk home takes so long that when she arrives, it is too dark to do her homework. Working through the lunch hour instead, she doesn’t see the truck from the bicycle library pull into the schoolyard. By the time she gets out there, the bikes are all gone. Anna hides her disappointment, happy to help her friends learn to balance and steer. She doesn’t know a compassionate friend will offer her a clever solution — and the chance to raise her own cloud of dust.

Inspired by organizations like The Village Bicycle Project that have opened bicycle libraries all across Africa, In a Cloud of Dust is an uplifting example of how a simple opportunity can make a dramatic change in a child’s life.


Welcome to the Family. Mary Hoffman & Ros Asquith, $19.99

How did you arrive in your family? Have you got a mom and a dad, or a step-mom, or foster parents, or maybe two dads or two moms? Find out about the many different ways of making a family. Maybe you can find one just like yours.

This book takes one element of The Great Big Book of Families — the arrival of new members into a family — and explores all the different ways a baby or child can become part of a family. The book includes natural birth within a nuclear family, adoption, fostering, same sex families and many other aspects of bringing babies or children into a family. This is a unique information book, with an important and positive message — every family is different and every family is equally valid and special, no matter how or when the children arrive.


The Kids' Book of Questions. Gregory Stock, $13.95

Kids love to be asked questions almost as much as they love to ask them. And asking is important — parents know the value of having meaningful conversations with their kids, especially as family time is under continuous assault from gadgets and devices. Now the book that solves those needs is back — announcing a fresh new edition of The Kids’ Book of Questions. Including subjects like the Internet, school violence, and climate change, the book remains a timeless treasure.

Here is a collection of questions designed to challenge, entertain, provoke, and expand young minds. These are the questions that let kids discover how they feel; let people know what they think; raise issues that everyone loves to discuss, including:

  • Thorny dilemmas: Would you rather have a job you didn’t like that paid a lot or a job you loved that paid just enough to get by?
  • Embarrassing challenges: Would you kiss someone in front of your whole class for $250?
  • Provocative ideas: What things do you think your parents do just to set an example for you?
  • Intriguing fantasies: If you could text any famous person and be sure they’d read and answer your text, who would you write to and what would you say?

Princess Pistachio. Marie-Louise Gay, $12.95

Pistachio has always known she was a princess. When a mysterious gift turns up on her birthday, she’s sure it’s only a matter of time before her real parents, the king and queen of Papua, arrive to take her away. In the meantime, though, she still has to eat her spinach and get up for school. Her friends still laugh when she wears her new gold crown to class. And her annoying baby sister insists on pestering her. When Pistachio’s angry wish makes Penny disappear, she will need the courage of a true princess to get her back.


Princess Pistachio and the Pest. Marie-Louise Gay, $12.95

It’s the first day of the summer holidays and Pistachio Shoelace has big plans. Plans that involve a compass, a cave, and a buried treasure. Plans that do not involve a troublemaking little sister wearing bunny ears and a Superman cape. Forced to take baby Penny to the park, Pistachio prepares for a dull day. But between fruit thefts, a witch’s garden, and an angry park warden with a rulebook, a day with Penny is anything but boring.


A Good Trade. Alma Fullerton, illustrated by Karen Patkau, $19.95

In a small Ugandan village, Kato wakes early to start the long, barefoot trek beyond his village and along fields dotted with cattle and guarded by soldiers. His destination is the village well, where he will pump a day’s supply of water into two jerry cans. Like every day, Kato lets the water splash over his hot, tired feet before carrying his heavy load back home, where his chores await him. But this is no ordinary day. The aid-worker’s truck has come to the village square, and in the back is a gift so special, the little boy rushes home to look for something to repay the aid-worker.


The Invisible Boy. Trudy Ludwig, illustrated by Patrice Barton, $18.95

Meet Brian, the invisible boy. Nobody ever seems to notice him or think to include him in their group, game, or birthday party... until, that is, a new kid comes to class. When Justin, the new boy, arrives, Brian is the first to make him feel welcome. And when Brian and Justin team up to work on a class project together, Brian finds a way to shine.

This gentle story shows how small acts of kindness can help children feel included and allow them to flourish. Any parent, teacher, or counselor looking for material that sensitively addresses the needs of quieter children will find The Invisible Boy a valuable and important resource. 


Take Away the A. Michael Escoffier, illustrated by Kris Di Giacomo, $26.50

Take Away the A is a fun, imaginative romp through the alphabet. The idea behind the book is that within every language there are words that change and become a different word through the simple subtraction of a single letter. In other words, without the A," the Beast is Best.

Discovering all of the words in the book is a lot of fun, and then there's the wild, exciting adventure that follows while readers try to find more!


Peach Girl. Raymond Nakamura, illustrated by Rebecca Bender, $19.95

When the farmer and her husband find a giant peach at their door, they can’t imagine how it got there. But they are even more surprised when the skin bursts open and out leaps... a girl!

Feisty Momoko declares that she is here to make the world a better place, and what better way to start than by investigating the rumours about a fearsome local ogre? Everyone says the ogre is taller than a tree, has teeth like knives, shoots flames from his eyes, and eats small children. The villagers won’t go near him. But Momoko wants to find out for herself, and her new friends Monkey, Dog, and Pheasant might just be able to help her — as long as she’s willing to share those tasty peach dumplings.


Diary of a Fly. Doreen Cronin & Harry Bliss, $12.50

Diary of a Spider. Doreen Cronin & Harry Bliss, $21.00

Diary of a Worm. Doreen Cronin & Harry Bliss, $21.00

Follow the day-to-day lives of some unusual friends, as they play, learn new things, and even get into (just a little!) trouble.


IF... a Mind-Bending New Way of Looking at Big Ideas and Numbers. David Smith, illustrated by Steve Adams, $19.95

"Some things are so huge or so old that it's hard to wrap your mind around them. But what if we took these big, hard-to-imagine objects and events and compared them to things we can see, feel and touch? Instantly, we'd see our world in a whole new way." So begins this endlessly intriguing guide to better understanding all those really big ideas and numbers children come across on a regular basis. Author David Smith has found clever devices to scale down everything from time lines (the history of Earth compressed into one year), to quantities (all the wealth in the world divided into one hundred coins), to size differences (the planets shown as different types of balls). Accompanying each description is a kid-friendly drawing by illustrator Steve Adams that visually reinforces the concept.


Alexander, Who's Trying His Best to Be the Best Boy Ever. Judith Viorst, illustrated by Isidre Monés, $21.99

Last night somebody ate a whole box of jelly donuts. That somebody woke up with a terrible bellyache, and that somebody’s mom found the empty box and told that somebody that there are going to be consequences. That somebody is Alexander, and Alexander really hates consequences. So from now on, he is going to try his best to be the Best Boy Ever. For the complete and entire rest of his life. Starting right this very minute.


Nancy Knows. Cybèle Young, $19.99

Nancy Knows is the charming story of an elephant who remember lots of things, except the very thing she is trying to remember. Each spread of this whimsical, arresting picture book features fantastic miniature paper sculptures within expressive outlines of a puzzled pachyderm. It's a book not to be forgotten.


DRAW! Raúl Colón, $21.99

A boy alone in his room. Pencils. Sketchbook in hand. What would it be like to on safari? Imagine. Draw...

Based on his own childhood, beloved and award-winning artist Raúl Colón’s wordless book is about the limitless nature of creativity and imagination.


Once Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories for All the Letters. Oliver Jeffers, $26.99

The letters of our alphabet work tirelessly to make words that in turn make stories, but what is there was a story FOR each of the letters instead? Turn the pages of this exquisite book to find out... Here you will discover twenty-six short stories introducing a host of new characters (plus the occasional familiar face). From Edmund the astronaut with his awkward fear of heights, via the dynamic new investigative due of the Owl and the Octopus, through to the Zeppelin that just might get Edmund a little bit closer to where he needs to be, this book is packed with funny, thrilling, perilous and above all entertaining tales inspired by every letter of the alphabet. 


Sam's Pet TEMPER. Sangeeta Bhadra & Marion Arbona, $18.95 (ages 3-7)

The hero of this picture book, Sam, has to wait for everything on the playground one day, and this makes him mad. Suddenly, an unusual thing appears. It runs around, shoving and tripping and pinching and stomping, until all the other children have run away. It was a Temper. At first, having a pet Temper is fun. But before long, the Temper starts causing trouble for Sam. And eventually, Sam comes to the realization that his Temper is something he needs to learn to control.


Pyjama Day. Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Can pyjamas be TOO perfect???


Bubbles in the Bathroom: Discover the Fascinating Science in Everyday Life. Susan Martineau, $9.99

Have some bath time fun with squirty squeezers, boats, bubbles and a bending toothbrush.


We're All Friends Here. Nancy Wilcox Richards & Tom Goldsmith, $7.99

Arthur is messy and noisy. Sonny is careful and quiet. Can two boys who are so different ever be friends?


Julia, Child. Kyo Maclear, Illustrated by Julie Morstad, $19.99

Julia and Simca are two young friends who agree that you can never use too much butter — and that it is best to be a child forever. Sharing a love of cooking and having no wish to turn into big, busy people who worry too much and dawdle too little, they decide to create a feast for growing and staying young. A playful, scrumptious celebration of the joy of eating, the importance of never completely growing up and mastering the art of having a good time, Julia, Child is a fictional tale loosely inspired by the life and spirit of the very real Julia Child — a story that should be taken with a grain of salt and a generous pat of butter.


Our Flag: the Story of Canada's Maple Leaf. Ann-Maureen Owens & Jane Yealland, $9.95

Discover the fascinating play-by-play of how today's beloved maple leaf flag design came to be — including how some government leaders took a personal interest in the design, as well as how ordinary Canadians were given the opportunity to weigh in with their own ideas!


Super Red Riding Hood. Claudia Dávila, $18.95

Never mind the stereotypes! Wolves don't have to be scary — and girls can be super heroes!


We All Have Different Families. Melissa Higgina, $8.95

Who is in your family? Let's share and celebrate what makes each family special!


Once Upon a Northern Night. Jean Pendziwol & Isabelle Arsenault, $17.95

In this exquisite lullaby, the beauty and wonder of a northern winter night unfold, with images of a soft snowfall, the wild animals that appear in the garden, the twinkling stars, the gentle rhythm of the northern lights and the etchings of frost on the window pane.

Jean Pendziwol's lyrical poem reflects a deep appreciation of the magic of a northern winter night where, even as a child slumbers, the world outside does not rest but continues its own natural rhythms.

Isabelle Arsenault's spare, beautifully rendered illustrations, with their subtle but striking use of color, make us feel that we too are experiencing the enchantment of that northern night. They simultaneously evoke winter's nighttime life and the cozy warmth and security of a beloved child's sleep.


Imogene's Antlers. David Small, $8.99

Imogene awakens one morning to find she has grown antlers! How much fun is that!??!


I Want to Go to the Moon. Tom Saunders, illustrated by Cynthia Nugent, $19.50

Although everyone told Neil Armstrong his dream of travelling to the moon was impossible, he never gave up. Tom Saunders' song tells the story of Neil’s life, step-by-step, until he reaches that world-changing "small step" and "giant leap." In this book, the inspiring lyrics are brought to life by the illustrations of award-winning Cynthia Nugent.


How to Knock Out Nightmares. Catherine Leblanc & Roland Garrigue, $18.95

They come at night and disturb our slumber... filled with creepy crawlers and daunting demons, nightmares inspire fear in even the best and bravest. Luckily, this book is filled with tricks and tips to finally banish all those bad dreams. Created to help kids sleep better at night, How to Knock Out Nightmares is packed with fun, colorful illustrations and witty text that will encourage children to overcome their bad dreams.


MINGAN My Village: Poems by Innu Schoolchildren. Illustrated by Rogé, $14.95

Illustrator Rogé visited a school in Mingan, an Innu village in northeastern Quebec. He spent a few days taking the time to photograph each child. Once he returned home to his studio, brush in hand, he revisited the eyes of these children and drew their portraits.

MINGAN my village is a collected of fifteen faces, and fifteen poems written by young Innu. Given a platform to be heard, the children chose to transport readers far away from the difficulties and problems related to their realities to see the beauty that surrounds them in nature.


Numeralia. Jorge Luján, illustrated by Isol. 18.95

From the first page of this unusual and original collaboration between Jorge Luján and Isol, readers will realize that this is not just another counting book. Whether they are discovering that three is for bedtime kisses, or that five is for secret creatures hiding in a glove, children will delight in the poetic and sometimes surreal text. This is a book that presents children with the opportunity to go beyond simply learning to count from zero to ten. The book will encourage very young children (and older ones as well) to create their own meanings and make their own connections between the text and the art.


Juggling the Jitters. Deborah Fannie Miller, illustrated by Danielle Bazinet, $12.95

When Jacob went to bed, everything got JITTERY! The Jitters kept multiplying and Jacob couldn't sleep. With Dad's help, Jacob learns to silly-dance and sing those jitters away.


All the Colors We Are: the Story of How We Get Our Skin Color. Katie Kissinger, photographs by Chris Bohnhoff, $18.95

ALL THE COLORS WE ARE offers children a simple, scientifically accurate explanation about how our skin color is determined by our ancestors, the sun, and melanin. It's also filled with photographs that capture the beautiful variety of skin tones. Reading this book frees children from the myths and stereotypes associated with skin color and helps them build positive identities as they accept, understand, and value our rich and diverse world. Unique activity ideas are included to help you extend the conversation with children. 


My Blue is Happy. Jessica Young, illustrated by Catia Chien, $18.00

Is red an angry kind of colour — or is it brave? Is pink pretty or annoying? Does BLUE make you happy or sad? And what about brown, orange, yellow, green, and black?


A Happy Hat. Cecil Kim, illustrated by Joo-Kyung Kim, $13.50

A HAPPY HAT is a sweet and upbeat tale of resilience, optimism, and hope. The life story of a hat — a very happy hat — and its various owners illustrates how dealing with disappointments and stressful situations is crucial to one’s well-being.


Little Red Writing. Joan Holub, illustrated by Melissa Sweet, $10.99

An exuberant retelling of Little Red Riding Hood, in which a brave, little red pencil finds her way through the many perils of writing a story, faces a ravenous pencil sharpener (the Wolf 3000)... and saves the day!


A Glass. Etienne Delessert, $22.99

Children's author and illustrator Etienne Delessert tells the story of Eglantine Besson, the woman who became his mother, and of the glass that came to represent their relationship.


Be Positive! Cheri Meiners, illustrated by Elizabeth Allen, $14.99

Bounce Back! A Book about Resilience. Cheri Meiners, illustrated by Elizabeth Allen, $14.99

Feel Confident! Cheri Meiners, illustrated by Elizabeth Allen, $14.99

Forgive and Let Go! A Book about Forgiveness. Cheri Meiners, illustrated by Elizabeth Allen, $14.99

Have Courage! A Book about Being Brave. Cheri Meiners, illustrated by Elizabeth Allen, $14.99

Stand Tall! A Book about Integrity. Cheri Meiners, illustrated by Elizabeth Allen, $14.99

Upbeat and true-to-life, these books inspire and guide preschool and primary-age children to accept and believe in themselves, ask for what they need, solve problems, show kindness to others, and make good decisions. Each book includes an activity guide for parents and teachers to use, with discussion questions, activities, games, and tips that reinforce the lessons from the book.


Peer Pressure Gauge. Julia Cook, illustrated by Anita Dufalla, $14.95

Young Norbert learns to listen to his inner voice and to stay strong — even in the face of pressure and taunts from his friends.


Time to Sign: Sign Language for Kids. Kathryn Clay, $9.95 (ages 5-9)

This helpful kid-friendly guide teaches the basics of American Sign Language (ASL). Kids will learn hundreds of words and phrases to help them communicate in everyday situations. Instructions on how to fingerspell the alphabet provides a good base to get started. It's time to sign!


Swamp Water. Robert Munsch, Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Victoria’s grandmother takes her out for a very special, fancy birthday lunch. But how special can a restaurant be if it doesn’t serve the food Victoria likes?


Victor’s Pink Pyjamas. Laura Alary, Illustrated by William Kimber, $12.95

Victor loves his accident-in-the-washing-machine pink pyjamas. They make him feel joyous. His father and his sister think pink is just for girls — and so do his friends and his classmates. But Victor knows lots of things that are pink and aren’t just for girls, like strawberry ice cream and the insides of seashells!


! Amy Krause Rosenthal & Tom Lichtenheld, $19.99

It's not easy being seen. Especially when you're not like everyone else. Especially when what sets you apart is you. Sometimes we squish ourselves to fit in. We shrink. Twist. Bend. A friend shows the way to endless possibilities. In this bold and highly visual book, an emphatic but misplaced exclamation point learns that being different can be very exciting! Period. 


When I Was Eight. Christy Jordan-Fenton, Margaret Pokiak-Fenton & Gabrielle Grimard, $9.95

Olemaun is eight and knows a lot of things, but she does not know how to read. To learn, she must travel to school far from her Arctic home, ignoring her father’s warnings. The nuns at the school take away her Inuit name and call her Margaret. They cut off her long hair, and force her to do chores. But Margaret is more determined than ever to read. Based on the true story of author Margaret Pokiak-Fenton.


Not My Girl. Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, illustrated by Gabrielle Grimard, $9.95

Margaret leaps off the boat and races toward her family. It's been two years since she left her Arctic home for the outsider's school, and she can barely contain her excitement. But the years at school have changed her, and Margaret's mother takes one look at her and says "Not my girl". Now Margaret must relearn her people's ways, and find her place in the world once again.


Extra Yarn. Marc Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen, $21.00

A wondrous tale, about a box full of yarn.


Sometimes Just One Is Just Right. Gayle Byrne & Mary Haverfield, $15.95

Being an only child has its ups and downs. This story, told through the eyes of an energetic boy, explores what it’s like to be an only child. Sometimes it’s lonely, sometimes it’s fun, but most of all it can be just right!


I Dreamt... a Book about Hope. Gabriela Olmo, $18.95

In many parts of the world, including North America, children are living with violence. Wars, gangs, guns, crime, bullying, harassment and fear keep many kids from living the full, free lives that every child should enjoy. This book was created in Mexico, where for the past six years a vicious war against drugs has brought fear and insecurity into every child’s life. Many children’s dreams have become nightmares. Some of Mexico’s best illustrators have donated their art to create this book, which gives children a way to talk about their fears, a reason to hope and the inspiration to resist falling into grief and depression.

Royalties from sales will be donated to IBBY’s Fund for Children in Crisis, which supports bibliotherapy projects that use books and reading to help children who have lived through wars, civil conflicts and natural disasters to think and talk about their experiences.


Oy Feh So? Cary Fagan, illustrated by Gary Clement, $17.95

In this hilariously written and illustrated story, three children turn their family's weekly Sunday visit from Aunt Essy, Aunt Chanah and Uncle Sam on its head. And in the end, they all have a ball.


The Art of Miss Chew. Patricia Polacco, $19.00

Trisha knew she wanted to be an artist. The trouble was — everything else she had to do at school! Reading, tests, projects — Trisha needed so much time to complete these than any of the other kids. With the help of a caring home room teacher, and a wonderful, outspoken art teacher, Trisha realizes her dream.


Seeing Red. Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Alex wants his hair to be just like his best friend Arie’s. Arie promises to teach him the secret for turning black hair to red… But what kind of a trick is it?


Healthy Kids. Maya Ajmera, Victoria Dunning & Cynthia Pon, $9.95

Kids around the world stay healthy when they eat good food, have access to clean water, live in safe homes, and share a loving community. The vibrant photographs in this book show the many ways kids can practice healthy habits, wherever they live.


Grace & Family. Mary Hoffman & Caroline Binch, $10.50

To Grace, family has always meant her Ma, her Nana, and her cat Paw-Paw. She hasn’t seen her father since she was a little girl, and he lives far away in another country.

When Papa invites her to visit him, she dreams of finding a different kind of family — and learns that families are what you make them.


Who’s In My Family? All About Our Families. Robie Harris, illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott, $19.00

Join Nellie and Gus and their family — plus all manner of other families — for a day at the zoo, where they see animal families galore! Full of charming illustrations depicting families of many configurations, this engaging story interweaves conversations between the siblings and a matter-of-fact text, making it clear to every child that every family has its own story.


Building Our House. Jonathan Bean, $19.99

In this unique construction book for kids who love tools and trucks, readers join a girl and her family as they pack up their old house in town and set out to build a new one in the country. Mom and Dad are going to make the new house themselves, from the ground up. From an empty lot to a finished home, every stage of their year-and-a-half-long building project is here. And at every step their lucky kids are watching and getting their hands dirty, in page after page brimming with machines, vehicles, and all kinds of house-making activities!

As he imagines it through the eyes of his older sister, this is Jonathan Bean’s retelling of his own family’s true experience, and includes an afterword with photographs from the author’s collection.


My Mother is Weird. Rachna Gilmore, illustrated by Brenda Jones, $9.95

A view of a mother’s bad day through the eyes of a child — a funny and loving story for children and parents.


Standing Up to Peer Pressure: a Guide to Being True to You. Jim Auer, illustrated by R. W. Alley, $10.95

This wise guide helps kids to stand up for themselves, encouraging a strong sense of self-identity.


It’s Our Nature. Rebeca Orozo, Illustrated by Menena Cottin, $14.99

In the grasslands, the forests, the deserts, and the seas, animals learn to get along. They tolerate each other’s differences and embrace diversity. We are part of the same animal kingdom. We too, can learn to live in harmony with the world around us!


Unplugged — Ella Gets Her Family Back. Laura Pederen, illustrated by Penny Weber, $22.95

Ella is really frustrated! Lately it seems like the whole family has forgotten how to be together. Instead of playing Hangman or making waffles, everyone is talking on cell phones, playing video games or using the computer. What’s it going to take for Ella to get through to them?


Ruby's Sleepover. Kathryn White, Illustrated by Miriam Latimer, $8.99 (ages 3 to 7)

Ruby and Mai are camping out in the backyard. As the night draws in, all sorts of scary characters head towards their tent. Luckily, Ruby has some magical objects in her backpack, but will they be enough to keep the girls safe?


The Underwear Book. Todd Parr, $7.99

A surprising and silly book about underwear, THE UNDERWEAR BOOK, features such wisdom as "DO wear fancy underwear under your dress," and "DON'T hang upside down on the monkey bars." Illustrated with Todd Parr's trademark bold, bright colors and silly scenes!


Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: a Muslim Book of Colors. Hena Khan & Mehrdokht Amini, $10.99

Magnificently capturing the colorful world of Islam for the youngest readers, this breathtaking and informative picture book celebrates Islam’s beauty and traditions. From a red prayer rug to a blue hijab, everyday colors are given special meaning as young readers learn about clothing, food, and other important elements of Islamic culture, with a young Muslim girl as a guide. Sure to inspire questions and observations about world religions and cultures, Golden Domes and Silver Lantern is equally at home in a classroom reading circle as it is being read to a child on a parent’s lap.


Virginia Wolf. Kyo Maclear & Isabelle Aresnault, $18.95

A story of two sisters — one blue, one sunny — both brimming with imagination.


My First French Phrases. Jill Kalz & Daniele Fabbri, $9.95

Colourful illustrations help make learning French fun — from the basics to cool phrases, this book will give you lots to talk about!


It's My Room! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Matthew is thrilled to find out that he is getting his own bedroom and won't have to share with anyone. Then all Mom's relatives come to stay and Matthew has to think of a way to get his room back. It isn't going to be easy.


One Love. Cedella Marley, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, $10.99

Based on Bob Marley's beloved song, ONE LOVE is his daughter's delightful and upbeat testament to the power of love, family and community.


One of Us. Peggy Moss & Penny Weber, $19.95 (ages 6-10)

Roberta is the new girl in class and moves from group to group, just trying to be herself! One of Us explores the stress of peer pressure and trying to “fit in” at school.


A Hen for Izzy Pippik. Aubrey Davis & Marie LaFrance, $18.95 (ages 4-8)

When Shaina finds a magnificent hen, she knows that Izzy Pippik, the hen's owner, is sure to return for her. In the meantime, Shaina decides she will care for the animal. But when dozens of eggs hatch and rowdy chickens scatter throughout the village, Shaina must fight the entire town if she has any hope of protecting the birds. Inspired by Jewish and Islamic traditional texts, this is a beautiful tale about doing the right thing, even in the face of adversity. 


French-English Picture Dictionary. Catherine Bruzzone & Louise Millar, $8.99

A simple, colourful picture dictionary for young language learners with over 350 useful words clearly illustrated and translated. A simple pronunciation guide is given for each word.


SPORK. Kyo Maclear & Isabelle Arsenault, $18.95

His mum is a spoon, his dad is a fork and he’s a bit of both … he’s SPORK!


It’s a Book. Lane Smith, $15.99

A mouse, a monkey and a jackass. And a book.


Put Me in a Book! Robert Munsch, $7.99

Hailey is really excited when a writer puts her in a book. But being in a book isn’t as much fun as it sounds — how is Hailey going to get OUT??


ROAR! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99 (ages 3-7)

When Isaac and Elena read a book about lions, all they want to do is RRRRRRROOOOOOOOAARRRRRRRRR!!


I Will Be Especially VERY Careful! Lauren Child, $21.00

Lola’s best friend has an extremely fabulous and very fluffy new coat — and Lola REALLY wants to borrow it.


You’re Mean, Lily Jean. Frieda Wishinsky & Kady MacDonald Denton, $19.99

Sisters Carly and Sandy always play together until a new neighbor joins in and starts bossing everyone around.


That Book Woman. Heather Henson, illustrated by David Small, $19.99

That Book Woman is a rare and moving tale that honors a special part of American history — the Pack Horse Librarians, who helped untold numbers of children see the stories amid the chicken scratch, and thus made them into lifetime readers.


Mama Miti. Donna Jo Napoli, illustrated by Kadir Nelson, $24.99

Stunning colorful collages illustrate the story of Nobel Peace Prize recipient Wangari Maathai, who changed her country, one tree at a time.


Chester. Mélanie Watt, $8.95

Chester is a rude and self-centered fur ball, determined to have the last word. Can author and illustrator Mélanie Watt keep Chester from taking over her book?


Chester’s Masterpiece, with NO help from Mélanie Watt. $18.95

Mélanie Watt and her cat Chester are at it again! This time Chester has hidden all of Mélanie’s art supplies and taken over the writing of this book.


Chester’s Back! Mélanie Watt, $9.95

That incorrigible cat Chester is back — and he is driving his creator Mélanie Watt crazy with all his hi-jinks! Maybe this time he has gone too far.


Have I Got a Book for You! Mélanie Watt, $17.95

Mr. Al Foxwood is one persistent salesman! He will do just about ANYTHING to sell you this book.


Victoria Goes to Brazil. Maria de Fatima Campos, $22.95 (ages 6-10)

Victoria travels with her Mum form their home in England to Brazil where Victoria gets to meet her cousins, aunts and uncles, and make many new friends on a visit that is far too short!


The Black Book of Colors. Menena Cottin, illustrated by Rosana Faria, $17.95

It is difficult for a sighted person to imagine what it is like to be blind. This groundbreaking, award-winning book endeavors to convey the experience of a person who can only see through his or her sense of touch, taste, smell or hearing.


Down the Drain! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Robert Munsch is back with the story of Adam, who HATES to take baths!


Just One Goal! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Ciara wants to build a rink on the river behind her house — but nobody wants to help!


Planting the Trees of Kenya: the Story of Wangari Maathai. Claire Nivola, $21.99

With glowing watercolor illustrations and lyrical prose, Claire Nivola tells the remarkable story of one woman’s effort to change the fate of her land by teaching many to care for it. An author’s note provides further information about Wangari Maathai and the Green Belt Movement.


How I Learned Geography. Uri Shulevitz, $18.95

Having fled from war in their troubled homeland, a boy and his family are living in poverty in a strange country. Food is scarce, so when the boy’s father brings home a map instead of bread for supper, at first the boy is furious. But when the map is hung on the wall, it floods their cheerless room with color. As the boy studies its every detail, he is transported to exotic places without ever leaving the room, and he eventually comes to realize that the map feeds him in a way that bread never could.



See our Parenting 6-12 booklist for adult titles.

A Trio of Tolerable Tales. Margaret Atwood, illustrated by Dušan Petričić, $22.99

Wordplay and outrageous adventures rule the day in these three humorous stories from Margaret Atwood, with illustrations by Dušan Petričić.

In Rude Ramsay and the Roaring Radishes, Ramsay runs away from his revolting relatives and makes a new friend with more refined tastes. The second tale, Bashful Bob and Doleful Dorinda, features Bob, who was raised by dogs, and Dorinda, who does housework for relatives who don’t like her. It is only when they become friends that they realize they can change their lives for the better. And finally, to get her parents back, Wenda and her woodchuck companion have to outsmart Widow Wallop in Wandering Wenda and Widow Wallop’s Wunderground Washery.


Superfab Saves the Day. Jean Leroy & Bérengère Delaporte, $17.95

Meet Superfab, the best-dressed superhero around. He's got a walk-in closet, an extensive collection of outfits, and fabulous style to boot. The only problem is, he can't leave his house to go fight crime until he has the perfect outfit on and sometimes that takes awhile. Sometimes it takes so long that by the time he arrives at the scene of a crime, another superhero has already gotten the job done. Superfab finds himself less and less in demand, until one day he gets called to the scene and discovers that his exquisite sense of style is just the weapon he needs to beat (and befriend) this particular monster.


The Wolves Return: a New Beginning for Yellowstone National Park. Celia Godkin, $19.95

In 1995–96 twenty-three Canadian gray wolves were released in Yellowstone National Park where, due to over-hunting, there had been no wolves at all for almost seventy years. This reintroduction project was an overwhelming success. Over twenty years later we can still see the changes the gray wolves brought to Yellowstone. Now that the elk graze higher ground to escape the wolves, tree seedlings in the valley are growing tall. Rivers change as beavers use the trees to build dams, and thriving wetlands have been established. This true story offers an important lesson about the difference one creature can make in creating a healthy, thriving world.

The Wolves Return features Godkin’s evocative, full-spread pencil crayon and watercolour illustrations and is further enhanced by extensive information on the Yellowstone Wolf Project, including maps and statistics that will delight young animal lovers and inquisitive minds.


Anna Carries Water. Olive Senior, illustrated by Laura James, $18.95

Anna fetches water from the spring every day, but she can’t carry it on her head like her older brothers and sisters. In this charming and poetic family story set in Jamaica, Commonwealth Prize-winning author Olive Senior shows young readers the power of determination, as Anna achieves her goal and overcomes her fear.


My Beautiful Birds. Suzanne Del Rizzo, $19.95

Behind Sami, the Syrian skyline is full of smoke. The boy follows his family and all his neighbours in a long line, as they trudge through the sands and hills to escape the bombs that have destroyed their homes. But all Sami can think of is his pet pigeons — will they escape too? He can’t forget his birds and what his family has left behind. Until, one day a canary, a dove, and a rose finch fly into the camp. They flutter around Sami and settle on his outstretched arms. For Sami it is one step in a long healing process at last.

A gentle yet moving story of refugees of the Syrian civil war, My Beautiful Birds illuminates the ongoing crisis as it affects its children. It shows the reality of the refugee camps, where people attempt to pick up their lives and carry on. And it reveals the hope of generations of people as they struggle to redefine home.


Malala: Activist for Girls' Education. Raphaële Frier, illustrated by Aurélia Fronty, $21.99

Malala Yousafzai stood up to the Taliban and fought for the right for all girls to receive an education. When she was just fifteen-years old, the Taliban attempted to kill Malala, but even this did not stop her activism. At age eighteen Malala became the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, for her work to ensure the education of all children around the world. Malala’s courage and conviction will inspire young readers in this beautifully illustrated biography.


The Journey. Francesca Sanna, $25.95

“I look up to the birds that seem to be following us. They are migrating just like us. And their journey, like ours, is very long, but they don’t have to cross any borders.”

What is it like to have to leave everything behind and travel many miles to somewhere unfamiliar and strange? A mother and her two children set out on such a journey; one filled with fear of the unknown, but also great hope.

Based on her interactions with people forced to seek a new home, and told from the perspective of a young child, Francesca Sanna has created a beautiful and sensitive book that is full of significance for our time.


The White Cat and the Monk. Jo Ellen Bogart, illustrated by Sydney Smith, $18.95

A monk leads a simple life. He studies his books late into the evening and searches for truth in their pages. His cat, Pangur, leads a simple life, too, chasing prey in the darkness. As night turns to dawn, Pangur leads his companion to the truth he has been seeking.

The White Cat and the Monk is a retelling of the classic Old Irish poem “Pangur Bán.” With Jo Ellen Bogart’s simple and elegant narration and Sydney Smith’s classically inspired images, this contemplative story pays tribute to the wisdom of animals and the wonders of the natural world.


OUT. Angela May George & Owen Swan, $14.99

I'm called an asylum seeker, but that's not my name.

We came here on a boat. Our trip took so long, sometimes I wondered if I would ever walk on grass again.

A brave little girl and her mother escape a war-torn land. On the difficult sea voyage there is little to eat, but there is abundant love and caring. Her adopted country offers a safe place to live, a new school, and supportive friends. There are also hurtful labels, flashbacks, and the ever-present ache of a missing father. Over time there’s a new job for her mother, time for play, music — even dancing! — and hope for the future.

Timely, powerful and moving, Out celebrates the resilience of the human spirit in the darkest times, and the many paths people take to build a new life.


What Matters. Alison Hughes & Holly Hatam, $19.95

What happens when one small boy picks up one small piece of litter? He doesn't know it, but his tiny act has big consequences. From the miniscule to the universal, What Matters sensitively explores nature's connections and traces the ripple effects of one child’s good deed to show how we can all make a big difference.


Under a Northern Moon. Mike Norris, illustrated by Shawna Lee Campbell, $16.00

Once a year if the night is clear, on the night of the Northern moon, all of the animals in the forest have a big party to celebrate life, before having to hibernate for the winter. On this particular night a traveller just happens to set up his camp on the very spot where the celebration takes place.


Amelia's Road. Linda Jacobs Altman & Enrique Sanchez, $14.95

Amelia Luisa Martinez hates roads. Los caminos, the roads, take her migrant worker family to fields where they labor all day, to schools where no one knows Amelia's name, and to bleak cabins that are not home. Amelia longs for a beautiful white house with a fine shade tree in the yard, where she can live without worrying about los caminos again. Then one day, Amelia discovers an "accidental road." At its end she finds an amazing old tree reminiscent of the one in her dreams. Its stately sense of permanence inspires her to put her own roots down in a very special way.


When the Rain Comes. Alma Fullerton, Illustrated by Kim La Fave, $19.95

It is time to plant the rice in Malini’s Sri Lankan community, and the little girl is both excited and nervous to help for the first time. What if she does it wrong? Will she be responsible if the crop fails? When the oxcart rumbles in loaded with seedlings, she reluctantly agrees to watch the big, imposing animal while the driver takes a break. Suddenly, the skies go dark with monsoon rain. A flash flood pours down the road, separating Malini from the driver and her family. They are shouting for her to run for higher ground, but what about the rice? Summoning up courage she never dreamed she possessed, Malini resolves to save ox, cart, and seedlings, no matter what it takes.


What Makes Us Unique? Our First Talk about Diversity. Jillian Roberts, illustrated by Cindy Revell, $19.95 (ages 3-6) 

When it comes to explaining physical, cultural and religious differences to children, it can be difficult to know where to begin. What Makes Us Unique? provides an accessible introduction to the concept of diversity, teaching children how to respect and celebrate people's differences and that ultimately, we are all much more alike than we are different. Additional questions at the back of the book allow for further discussion.


Buddy and Earl Go Exploring. Maureen Fergus, illustrated by Carey Sookocheff, $16.95

Buddy and Earl are safely tucked in for the night; Buddy on his blanket and Earl in his cage. But just as Buddy settles in for a nice, long sleep, Earl says it’s time to say “Bon voyage.” Soon these mismatched pals are at it again, exploring the wilds of the kitchen and defending a lovely lady hedgehog — who may or may not be Mom’s hairbrush — from imminent danger. When they’ve finally vanquished the greatest monster of all — the vacuum cleaner — it’s time for some well-earned shut-eye.


Buddy and Earl and the Great Big Baby. Maureen Fergus, illustrated by Carey Sookocheff, $16.95

Mom’s friend Mrs. Cunningham is coming for a visit, and she’s bringing her baby! While Buddy tries to explain the ins and outs of babydom to Earl, neither of them is prepared for the chaos the small and adorable creature brings with him. When the baby manages to escape from his cage — which Buddy gently suggests is really just a playpen — it’s up to our favorite odd couple to save the day.


Buddy and Earl. Maureen Fergus, illustrated by Carey Sookocheff, $16.95

Buddy does not know what is in the box that Meredith carries into the living room. But when the small, prickly creature says he is a pirate — and that Buddy is a pirate too — the two mismatched friends are off on a grand adventure. In this first book in the Buddy and Earl series, a dog who likes to play by the rules meets a hedgehog who knows no limits. Their friendship is tender and loyal, and their adventures are funny and imaginative.


All the World a Poem. Gilles Tibo, illustrated by Manon Gauthier, $18.95

In Gilles Tibo’s wonder-filled tribute to poetry, poems bloom in fields, fly on the wings of birds, and float on the foam of the sea. They are written in the dark of night, in the light of happiness, and in the warmth of the writer’s heart. Each poem is illustrated with Manon Gauthier’s whimsical paper collage art, which is both child-like and sophisticated.

Rhymed or unrhymed, regular or irregular, the verses bring not just poems but the very concept of poetry to the level of a child, making them accessible to all. If all the world is a poem, then anyone can be a poet!


The Boy & the Bindi. Vivek Shraya, illustrated by Rajni Perera, $17.95 (ages 4-8)

In this beautiful children's picture book by Vivek Shraya, a five-year-old boy becomes fascinated with his mother's bindi, the red dot commonly worn by South Asian women to indicate the point at which creation begins, and wishes to have one of his own. Rather than chastise her son, she agrees to it, and teaches him about its cultural significance, allowing the boy to discover the magic of the bindi, which in turn gives him permission to be more fully himself.

Beautifully illustrated with hand paintings by Rajni Perera, The Boy & the Bindi is a joyful celebration of gender and cultural difference. 


A Family is Family is a Family. Sara O'Leary, illustrated by Qin Leng, $18.95

When a teacher asks the children in her class to think about what makes their families special, the answers are all different in many ways — but the same in the one way that matters most of all. One child is worried that her family is just too different to explain, but listens as her classmates talk about what makes their families special. One is raised by a grandmother, and another has two dads. One has many stepsiblings, and another has a new baby in the family. As her classmates describe who they live with and who loves them — family of every shape, size and every kind of relation — the child realizes that as long as her family is full of caring people, it is special.


Ada Twist, Scientist. Andrea Beaty, Illustrated by David Roberts, $21.95

Like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie, scientist Ada has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. What would you do with a problem like this? Not afraid of failure, Ada embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But, this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble!


So Much Snow! Robert Munsch, $7.99

A blizzard is coming, but Jasmine loves snow — and she doesn't want to miss out on Pizza Day at school. So off she goes — even as the snow get deeper, and deeper, and ...deeper...


Babushka Baba Yaga. Patricia Polacco, $8.50

Baba Yaga is a witch famous throughout Russia for eating children, but this Babushka Baba Yaga is a lonely old woman who just wants a grandchild to love.


Rosie the Raven. Helga Bansch, $21.95

There’s something very different going on in the raven’s nest. When the eggs hatch, a little girl emerges from one of the shells, along with her black raven siblings. Loving raven parents take their little Rosie just the way she is.

In the beginning, Rosie tries to do everything her siblings do. She opens her mouth to receive worms from her parents, tries to caw until she is hoarse, and wildly flaps her arms in an attempt to fly. The neighbors offer encouragement. “Rub it with birch leaves. That will make its feathers grow!” Rosie finally realizes she is different. Maybe she can’t caw or fly, but a world of discovery awaits her nonetheless.

Helga Bansch’s exquisite artwork of collages and colored images bring humor, mood, and emotion to Rosie’s story. The reader is drawn to Rosie from the instant she pushes herself from the egg, smiling and happy to greet her family, oblivious to her differences.


The Man with the Violin. Kathy Stinson, illustrated Dušan Petričić, $9.95

Who is playing that beautiful music in the subway? And why is nobody listening?

Dylan is someone who notices things. His mom is someone who doesn’t. So try as he might, Dylan can’t get his mom to listen to the man playing the violin in the subway station. But Dylan is swept away by the soaring and swooping notes that fill the air as crowds of oblivious people rush by. With the beautiful music in his head all day long, Dylan can’t forget the violinist, and finally succeeds in making his mother stop and listen, too.

This gorgeous picture book is based on the true story of Joshua Bell, the renowned American violinist who famously took his instrument down into the Washington D.C. subway for a free concert. More than a thousand commuters rushed by him, but only seven stopped to listen for more than a minute. In The Man with the Violin, bestselling author Kathy Stinson has woven a heart-warming story that reminds us all to stop and appreciate the beauty that surrounds us.


The Artist and Me. Shane Peacock, illustrated by Sophie Casson, $18.95

Vincent van Gogh is now known as an acclaimed, incomparable Post-impressionist painter. But when he lived in Arles, France, in the 1880s, he was mocked for being different. Back then, van Gogh was an eccentric man with wild red hair who used clashing hues to paint unusual-looking people and strange starry skies. Children and adults alike called him names and laughed at him. Nobody bought his art. But he kept painting.

Inspired by these events, The Artist and Me is the fictional confession of one of van Gogh’s bullies — a young boy who adopted the popular attitude of adults around him. It’s not until the boy faces his victim alone that he realizes there is more than one way to see the world. The lyrical text carries the emotional weight of the subject and will leave readers with the understanding that everyone’s point of view is valuable.


The Dot. Peter H. Reynolds, $16.00

Her teacher smiled. "Just make a mark and see where it takes you." Art class is over, but Vashti is sitting glued to her chair in front of a blank piece of paper. The words of her teacher are a gentle invitation to express herself. But Vashti can’t draw — she’s no artist. To prove her point, Vashti jabs at a blank sheet of paper to make an unremarkable and angry mark. "There!" she says. That one little dot marks the beginning of Vashti’s journey of surprise and self-discovery.


ISH. Peter H. Reynolds, $18.00

Ramon loved to draw. Anytime. Anything. Anywhere. Drawing is what Ramon does. It¹s what makes him happy. But in one split second, all that changes. A single reckless remark by Ramon's older brother, Leon, turns Ramon's carefree sketches into joyless struggles. Luckily for Ramon, though, his little sister, Marisol, sees the world differently. She opens his eyes to something a lot more valuable than getting things just "right."


Playing from the Heart. Peter H. Reynolds, $20.00

When a young boy begins to play on his family’s piano, reveling in the fun of plunking the keys, his father signs him up for lessons so that he can learn to play properly. With his father’s encouragement, Raj learns notes, then scales, then songs, and finally classical pieces that his father can recognize and be proud of. But the more Raj practices and the more skilled he becomes, the less he enjoys playing, until he grows up and stops playing altogether. But when his father becomes ill and asks Raj to play for him, will Raj remember how to play from the heart?


Lucy Tries Soccer. Lisa Bowes, illustrated by James Hearne, $12.95

Eager to try a summer sport, Lucy and her friends meet at the soccer field for their first game of three-on-three! Thanks to Coach Nick, Lucy and the rest of Team Blue learn a few basic skills as they prepare to face Team Red.


Lucy Tries Short Track. Lisa Bowes, illustrated by James Hearne, $12.95

Lucy is of on another speedy adventure — this time, she laces up her skates and tries short track speed skating. It's not as easy as it looks. When you skate really fast around tight turns, you just might crash! But with her friends at her side, Lucy skims across the ice in a thrilling race to the finish.


Art's Supplies. Chris Tougas, $9.95

In this delightful tale of the power of the imagination, Art's supplies come to life in the studio, creating mayhem and magic — and art! Pastels, pencils, paints, crayons, brushes and markers... everything gets in on the act of creating a mess-terpiece of fun. Chris Tougas's brilliant illustrations and clever text explore the essence of the creative process in a way that children will understand.


The Night Gardener. Terry Fan & Eric Fan, $21.99

One day, William discovers that the tree outside his window has been sculpted into a wise owl. In the following days, more topiaries appear, and each one is more beautiful than the last. Soon, William’s gray little town is full of color and life. And though the mysterious night gardener disappears as suddenly as he appeared, William — and his town — are changed forever.

With breathtaking illustrations and spare, sweet text, this masterpiece about enjoying the beauty of nature is sure to become an instant classic.


Paul the Pigeon. Jane Mullis, $11.95

Beautifully illustrated, this is the funny and engaging story of a street-wise pigeon who decides to do some travelling... by subway.


Finding Winnie: the True Story of the World's Most Famous Bear. Lindsay Mattick, illustrated by Sophie Blackall, $19.99

The remarkable true story of the bear who inspired Winnie-the-Pooh.

During World War I, Captain Harry Colebourn, a Canadian veterinarian on his way to serve with cavalry units in Europe, rescued a bear cub in White River, Ontario. He named the bear Winnie, after his hometown of Winnipeg, and he took the bear to war. Harry Colebourn's real-life great-granddaughter Lindsay Mattick recounts their incredible journey, from a northern Canadian town to a convoy across the ocean to an army base in England... and finally to the London Zoo, where Winnie made a new friend: a boy named Christopher Robin.

Gentle yet haunting illustrations by acclaimed illustrator Sophie Blackall bring the wartime era to life, and are complemented by photographs and ephemera from the Colebourn family archives.


The Angry Little Puffin. Timothy Young, $23.99

This is the story of a puffin who is upset that he’s constantly mistaken for a penguin. He finally reaches his breaking point and goes on a rant about the many differences between the two. A little girl stops him in mid-speech because she does know the differences, and he listens as she explains to her father why puffins are her favorite. When you are feeling alone and misunderstood, sometimes it only takes the understanding of one small person to turn things around. A charming picture book with 18 fun colorful spreads showing children what frustration and feeling alone looks like from the outside, how to get over anger, and how to reach out to others when they are frustrated.


Kenya's Art: Recycle! Reuse! Make Art! Linda Trice, illustrated by hazel Mitchell, $18.95

Kenya’s class is on spring vacation and their teacher asked them to write a report about how they spent their time. But vacation is almost over and Kenya hasn't done anything worth noting. A late visit to a museum's recycling exhibit and a walk through her neighborhood with her daddy inspire Kenya to use her old, broken toys and other items to make art with her family. Now she's prepared to teach her whole class how to Recycle! Reuse! Make Art!


Library Day. Anne Rockwell, illustrated by Lizzie Rockwell, $21.99 (ages 4-8)

Beloved author Anne Rockwell celebrates books, the love of reading, and of course, libraries, with a gorgeous new picture book about a child’s first visit to the library!


The Wheels on the Tuk Tuk. Kabir Sehgal & Surishtha Sehgal, illustrated by Jess Golden, $22.99 (ages 4-8)

This picture book brings an international twist to the beloved nursery rhyme, The Wheels on the Bus, by bringing you aboard a busy three-wheeled taxi in India! Anything can happen as the tuk tuk rolls through town — from an elephant encounter to a tasty treat to a grand fireworks display. And in the midst of all the action, one thing’s for sure: passengers young and old love every minute of their exciting ride as the wheels of the tuk tuk go round and round.


Stella Batts: None of Your Business. Courtney Sheinmel, illustrated by Jennifer Bell, $5.99

Can you keep a secret? Stella Batts has a lot of secrets to keep these days. There's the secret of what really happened to her little sister's pet fish, and there's the secret school project she's working on with her friend Lucy, and there's the secret on the second floor of her family's candy store. Actually, Stella doesn't know the candy store secret yet, because her dad won't tell her. Even though she's eight years old, and that's old enough to be trusted! Stella hasn't told any of her other secrets all week, and some of her other friends are feeling left out. But that's the problem with being told a secret: You have to keep it!


Stella Batts: Something Blue. Courtney Sheinmel, illustrated by Jennifer Bell, $5.99

The Batts family has arrived at a hotel in Los Angeles and everything is all set for Aunt Laura’s wedding weekend. Stella and Penny are going to be getting a new uncle, and a new cousin! Plus, they get to be flower girls, and wear fancy dresses, and walk down the aisle throwing rose petals. It’s going to be perfect, just the way Aunt Laura has imagined it. Just the way Stella has imagined it, too. But sometimes a wedding doesn’t happen the way anyone thinks it will, including the bride. Things are starting to go wrong, and Stella is worried that it’s all her fault!


The Tea Party in the Woods. Akiko Miyakoshi, $18.95

When a young girl named Kikko realizes her father has forgotten the pie he was supposed to bring to Grandma's house, she offers to try and catch him as he makes his way through the woods. She hurriedly follows her father's footprints in the snow and happens upon a large house she has never seen before. Curious, Kikko peers through the window, when she is startled by a small lamb wearing a coat and carrying a purse. Even more surprising, the lamb speaks, asking her in a kind voice, “Are you here for the tea party?” Suddenly, Kikko realizes her trip through the woods has turned into something magical.


Imagine a World. Rob Gonsalves, $22.99

Imagine a world where the sky becomes the Earth; where a waterfall freefalls to become dancing women; where you can cut mountains out of curtains, and ships sail into the sky.


Raymond’s Perfect Present. Therese On Louie, $13.95

One day Raymond sees a young woman smile with pleasure when she is given a gift of flowers. Maybe I could buy Mom some flowers, Raymond thinks, to help her feel better now that she is home from the hospital. When Raymond realizes he doesn't have enough money to buy flowers, he decides to grow them from seeds, but his mother has to return to the hospital before the flowers bloom. As the flowers grow and then begin to wilt, Raymond fears his mother will never see his present after all. The gift she receives instead is a total surprise, and more perfect than anything Raymond has planned. 


Amber Was Brave, Essie Was Smart. Vera B. Williams, $9.75

Essie is smart. She can read hard library books and make cocoa. Amber is brave. She isn't afraid of the rat in the wall or of climbing up in high places. Amber and Essie are sisters and best friends. Together, they can do anything.


The Good Little Book. Kyo MacLear, $18.99

While banished to a dusty study one day "to think things over," a boy pulls a book off a shelf and with great reluctance begins to read. As the afternoon passes, the story nabs him and carries him away. Before long, this good little book becomes his loyal companion, accompanying him everywhere... until, one day, the book is lost. Will this bad little boy get back his good little book? Will the good little book survive on its own without a proper jacket? A quirky, enchanting tale of literary love and loss, and love found again, that will win the heart of even the most reluctant reader.


The Children’s Book of Green Habits. Sophie Giles, illustrated by Kate Davies, $13.99

Help your child to discover that the world is a happier and more sustainable place if they have green habits!


Ben Says Goodbye. Sarah Ellis, $18.95

When Ben’s best friend Peter moves away, Ben decides that he will move, too — into a “cave” under the dining room table. Caveman Ben doesn’t need any friends except his tame (stuffed) lion. He hunts for his food (thoughtfully left on a plate by Mom and Dad) and communicates in grunts. And in the safety of his cave he can imagine a world where friends control their own destinies and distance is no obstacle.


I’m New Here. Anne Sibley O’Brien,$18.95

Maria is from Spain, Jin is from Korea, and Fatima is from Somalia. All three are new to their American elementary school, and each has trouble speaking, writing, and sharing ideas in English. Through self-determination and with encouragement from their peers and teachers, the students learn to feel confident and comfortable in their new school without losing a sense of their home country, language, and identity. 


Bug in a Vacuum. Mélanie Watt, $24.99

A bug flies through an open door into a house, through a bathroom, across a kitchen and bedroom and into a living room... where its entire life changes with the switch of a button. Sucked into the void of a vacuum bag, this one little bug moves through denial, bargaining, anger, despair and eventually acceptance — the five stages of grief — as it comes to terms with its fate. Will there be a light at the end of the tunnel? Will there be dust bunnies in the void? A funny, suspenseful and poignant look at the travails of a bug trapped in a vacuum.


Alphabet School. Stephen Johnson, $22.99

Imagine a school. Any school. Be it your school, one from memory, or even a dream school. Then enter and embark on a journey of wonder and delight. Look closely. There’s a letter C in the curve of a globe, a little L in the handle of a pencil sharpener, or at recess, a vibrant yellow V in a geodesic climbing dome. Can you find the letters on every page?


An ‘A’ from Miss Kehler. Patricia Polacco, $19.99

Trisha is nervous about being chosen for Miss Keller’s writing class. “Killer Keller” demands that her students dazzle her with their writing, and rumor has it that she has never given an A. The rumors turn out to be all too true — there’s just no pleasing Miss Keller. Then an unexpected loss leaves Trisha heartbroken. Thoughts of teachers and grades forgotten, she pours out her soul in a personal narrative. And when Miss Keller reads it, she tells Trisha, “You’ve given your words wings.”


The Bear Report. Thyra Heder, $21.95

Sophie does not want to do her homework, a research report on polar bears. Bor-ing. They’re big. They eat things. They’re mean. What else is there to say about them anyway? As it turns out, plenty. And when a polar bear named Olafur swoops her away to the Arctic, she soon learns all about the playful bear’s habits and habitat — from glacier mice to the northern lights — and, despite her first reservations, she finds herself not just interested but excited about the Arctic. When the two are swept out to sea on an iceberg, Sophie’s new knowledge and knack for creative thinking pay off in a big way: she calls a whale to their aid! Inspired by her journey, she’s ready to return home and take another swing at her assignment, this time with gusto.


Ready, Set, Go! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Miranda's dad is running in his very first big race. She goes to get him a drink of water, but when she gets back the race has already started. What is she going to do?


This is Sadie. Sara O'Leary & Julie Morstad, $19.99

Sadie is a little girl with a big imagination. She has been a girl who lived under the sea and a boy raised by wolves. She has had adventures in wonderland and visited the world of fairytales. She whispers to the dresses in her closet and talks to birds in the treetops. She has wings that take her anywhere she wants to go, but that always bring her home again. She likes to make things — boats out of boxes and castles out of cushions. But more than anything Sadie likes stories, because you can make them from nothing at all. For Sadie, the world is so full of wonderful possibilities... This is Sadie, and this is her story.


The Day the Crayons Came Home. Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers, $21.99

Maroon crayon has been marooned. Pea Green crayon wants to see the world. Neon Red crayon is just, well, lost. What happens when all the lost and forgotten crayons write home?


The Day the Crayons Quit. Drew Daywalt, Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers, $19.00

The battle lines have been drawn …


The New Kid. Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick, $10.99

Ellie's not like the other children on her street. She hides inside her grey coat and the children tease her. But with her powerful imagination and talent for making up games, and Ellie soon shows everyone what a wonderful friend she can be. 


Under Your Nose: a Book about Nature's Gifts. Judith & Shandley McMurray, foreword by Robert Bateman, $19.95

Chloe and Zachary reluctantly join their grandparents for a trip to the cottage. Equipped with their digital devices, they feel ready for a relaxing week playing games. However, as they soon discover, Nature has a different plan. This vividly illustrated book portrays the beauty and mystery of the natural world through their eyes, in this adventure of fun and discovery.


The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline, $8.99 (ages 7-10)

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who treated him with the utmost care and adored him completely. And then, one day, he was lost. 

Kate DiCamillo takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the top of a garbage heap to the fireside of a hobo camp, from the bedside of an ailing child to the bustling streets of Memphis. And along the way, we are shown a true miracle — that even a heart of the most breakable kind can learn to love, to lose, and to love again.


Lailah's Lunchbox: a Ramadan Story. Reem Faruqi, illustrated by Lea Lyon, $10.95

Lailah is in a new school in a new country, thousands of miles from her old home, and missing her old friends. When Ramadan begins, she is excited that she is finally old enough to participate in the fasting but worried that her classmates won’t understand why she doesn’t join them in the lunchroom. Lailah solves her problem with help from the school librarian and her teacher and in doing so learns that she can make new friends who respect her beliefs.


My Name is Blessing. Eric Walters, illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes, $19.99

Based on the life of a real boy, this warm-hearted, beautifully illustrated book tells the story of Baraka, a young Kenyan boy with a physical disability. Baraka and eight cousins live with their grandmother. She gives them boundless love, but there is never enough money or food, and life is hard — love doesn't feed hungry stomachs or clothe growing bodies, or school keen minds. Baraka is too young, and, with his disability, needs too much, and she is too old. A difficult choice must be made, and grandmother and grandchild set off on a journey to see if there is a place at the orphanage for Baraka. The story begins by looking at Baraka's physical disability as a misfortune, but ends by looking beyond the disability, to his great heart and spirit, and the blessings he brings.


Under a Pig Tree: a History of the Noble Fruit. Margie Palatini, illustrated by Chuck Groenik, $18.95

The publisher and author of Under a Pig Tree seem to be having communication issues. The author has written a clear, no-nonsense history of figs. But the publisher is sure she meant pigs. After all, what’s the difference between two measly letters? What results is a hilarious illustrated history of pigs, from the earliest times (“Pigs were presented as ‘medals’ to the winners of the first Olympics”) to the present day (“There is nothing better than enjoying a cup of tea or glass of milk with one of those famous Pig Newtons”). The author, needless to say, is not happy about this “little mix-up” and makes her feelings very clearly known — by scrawling all over the book!

With sticky notes from the publisher, angry scribbles from the author, wrinkles, and pages askew, Under a Pig Tree is a playful peek into a book in “mid-production” and a humorous look at the consequences of small mistakes.


Layla's Head Scarf. Miriam Cohen, illustrated by Ronald Himler, $22.95

Layla is a shy new girl in first grade and her classmates wonder why she wears a head scarf. As the school day progresses, the first graders learn about Layla's culture and help make her feel more at ease in her new school.


Bright Sky, Starry City. Uma Krishnaswami, illustrated by Aimée Sicuro, $17.95

Phoebe helps her dad set up telescopes on the sidewalk outside his store. It’s a special night — Saturn and Mars are going to appear together in the sky. But will Phoebe be able to see them with all the city lights? Raindrops begin to fall, followed by lightning and thunder. Phoebe is filled with disappointment as she and her father hurry inside to wait out the storm. But suddenly the power fails and then, amazingly, the rain and clouds disappear. Phoebe and her dad and all kinds of people spill into the street. And there, in the bright night sky, the splendor of the planets and a multitude of stars are revealed for all to see.

An illustrated afterword includes information about the solar system, planetary conjunctions and rings, moons, telescopes and light pollution. A glossary and recommended further reading are also included.


More Pies! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Samuel has woken up hungry and it seems nothing can satisfy him. For breakfast he eats huge bowls of cereal, milk shakes, stacks of pancakes, and two fried chickens, but it's not enough. Luckily, there's a pie eating contest in the park, where Samuel eats not one, not two, but SIX pies — CHUKA CHUKA CHOMP! To everyone's surprise, he wins the contest without turning green and falling under the table. But what will happen when he discovers his mother has made him yet another pie for lunch?! 


And What If I Won't?  Maureen Fergus, illustrated by Qin Leng, $17.95

When Benny’s mother asks him to put his dirty plate in the sink, he responds by asking: “What would you do if I said no?” Her answer is predictable, but not enough for Benny, whose “what if?” line of questioning continues as he dreams up increasingly naughty ideas.


Look Where We Live! A First Book of Community Building. Scot Ritchie, $16.95

In this engaging nonfiction picture book, five young friends — Nick, Yulee, Pedro, Sally and Martin — spend the day traveling around their neighborhood and participating in activities designed to raise money for their local library. Along the way, they learn about the people and places that make up their community and what it means to be a part of one.


Just a Walk. Jordan Wheeler, Illustrated by Chris Auchter, $10.95 

In Just a Walk, a young boy named Chuck goes for a simple walk that turns into a day of crazy adventure. Chuck encounters animals, fish and birds that lead him on a wild journey through their various habitats.

Jordan Wheeler's whimsical rhyming will capture the young readers attention and Chuck’s hilarious predicaments will keep all ages laughing for more.


Jacob's New Dress. Sarah & Ian Hoffman, illustrated by Chris Case, $25.95

Jacob loves playing dress-up, when he can be anything he wants to be. Some kids at school say he can’t wear “girl” clothes, but Jacob wants to wear a dress to school. Can he convince his parents to let him wear what he wants? This heartwarming story speaks to the unique challenges faced by boys who don’t identify with traditional gender roles.


The Great Big Green Book. Mary Hoffman & Ros Asquith, $20.99

From a simple introduction to our home in Space,  the authors explain what we need for life on Earth, and show the importance of the rainforests and the oceans; they stress the need to look after our planet and show how some of the things we take for granted are running out, and how we have polluted so much of our planet. The action plans include saving water, saving energy, recycling, repairing, growing seasonal food, cooking fresh food, saving on packing, asking questions… and thinking of new inventions and big ideas.


1

Community Soup. Alma Fullerton, $19.95

In a garden outside a Kenyan schoolhouse, children are working together to harvest the vegetables they have grown and make them into a soup for everyone to share. But Kioni is having trouble: her herd of mischievous goats followed her to school today and they are trying to eat all the vegetables. The ensuing chaos caused by the goats is cleverly resolved by the children, making their vegetable soup very tasty while saving Kioni’s four-legged intruders at the same time.


Joey Daring Caring and Curious: How a Mischief Maker Uncovers Unconditional Love. Marcella Marino Craver, Illustrated by Joanne Lew-Vriethoff, $11.95 (ages 4-8)

Joey is concerned that Mom prefers his siblings over him. Joey is more rambunctious and mischievous than his studious older brother Jake and his sweet baby sister Olivia. Is it possible that Mom loves Joey, Jake and Olivia unconditionally, mischief and all?


Dreams of Freedom in Words and Pictures. Amnesty International, $20.99

This inspirational book contains 17 quotations about many different aspects of Freedom, from the freedom to have an education to the freedom not to be hurt or tortured, the freedom to have a home and the freedom to be yourself. All the quotations have been chosen to be understood and appreciated by children.


The Incredible Book Eating Boy. Oliver Jeffers, $10.99

The mouth-watering new book from acclaimed author illustrator, Oliver Jeffers. Henry loves books... but not like you and I. He loves to EAT books! This exciting new story follows the trials and tribulations of a boy with a voracious appetite for books. Henry discovers his unusual taste by mistake one day, and is soon swept up in his new-found passion — gorging on every delicious book in sight! And better still, he realises that the more books he eats, the smarter he gets. Henry dreams of becoming the Incredible Book Eating Boy; the smartest boy in the world! But a book-eating diet isn't the healthiest of habits, as Henry soon finds out.


Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin. Chieri Uegaki & Qin Leng, $18.95

In this beautifully written picture book, Hana Hashimoto has signed up to play her violin at her school's talent show. The trouble is, she's only a beginner, and she's had only three lessons. Her brothers insist she isn't good enough. "It's a talent show, Hana," they tell her. "You'll be a disaster!" Hana remembers how wonderfully her talented grandfather, or Ojiichan, played his violin when she was visiting him in Japan. So, just like Ojiichan, Hana practices every day. She is determined to play her best. When Hana's confidence wavers on the night of the show, however, she begins to wonder if her brothers were right. But then Hana surprises everyone once it's her turn to perform — even herself!


Gustave. Rémy Simard, Pierre Pratt. $18.95

A little mouse and his friend, Gustave, go out to play one afternoon in this darkly comic story about the sadness of losing a friend and the joy of making a new one.

The mouse’s mother has always warned the young friends not to stray too far from home. There is a cat, she says, and it is dangerous to go far away. But danger doesn’t stop this curious pair, and soon they find themselves face-to-face with their big blue-eyed enemy. In a feat of bravery, Gustave allows his friend the chance to escape — but is gobbled up by the cat in the process. Heartbroken, the little mouse must return home — without his friend — and tell his mother what has happened.

A sweet surprise ending turns this melancholy tale of friendship into a strangely funny book.


I'm Awesome Because. Ipsita Paul, $13.99 paperback; $34.99 hardcover

Gabby celebrates all of her differences and recognizes that everyone is awesome in their own unique way! I’m Awesome Because is an uplifting book for multiracial children and families. With eye catching illustrations and poetic verses, your child will be building a solid foundation of confidence and self-love.

You can create your very own Awesome List at the end of the book so that your child can tap into their own unique awesomeness.


Hope Springs. Eric Walters, illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes, $19.99

A drought has settled in the area around the orphanage where Boniface lives. There are long line-ups at the tiny spring where all the local people get their water, and suddenly the orphans are pushed to the back of the line, unwelcome. Boniface's houseparent, Henry, tells him that the people were mean out of fear — they feared there would not be enough water for their families. When the building of the orphanage's well is completed, Boniface has an idea to help the villagers. A lovely story of kindness and heart, this story shows that, through compassion and understanding, true generosity can spring from unexpected places.


The Old Ways. Susan Margaret Chapman, illustrated by John Mantha, $19.95

Simon enjoys school, TV, pizza, and video games. So when his grandmother tells legends of the sea goddess, Sedna, and his grandfather invites him to build an igloo, Simon's heart sinks. Secretly he thinks his grandparents are stuck in their old ways. Secretly his grandparents hide their disappointment and wait for "another time."

Soon enough, that other times comes. When he and his grandparents prepare to visit relatives in Igloolik, Simon thinks it is ridiculous to heap oil lamps, extra fuel, tools, food, snowshoes, and caribou skins onto their sled. But when a blizzard closes in, and the snowmobile breaks down, Simon begins to understand the value of traditional ways.


Earth to Audrey. Susan Hughes, illustrated by Stéphane Poulin, $6.95

Audrey comes into Ray's life like an earthbound star. Everything about her is a bit far-out. And she's always in her own little world. So Ray decides that this unusual girl who has dropped into his neighborhood for the summer must be an alien. As they become friends, Audrey takes Ray on a journey of discovery — one that enables him to see his own planet in a new light. Soon, Ray can't imagine life on Earth without her. 


Sam & Dave Dig a Hole. Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen, $19.00

Sam and Dave are on a mission. A mission to find something spectacular. So they dig a hole. And they keep digging. And they find... nothing. Yet the day turns out to be pretty spectacular after all. Attentive readers will be rewarded with a rare treasure in this witty story of looking for the extraordinary — and finding it in a manner you’d never expect.


We All Have Different Abilities. Melissa Higgins, $8.95

What can you do? Tie your shoes? Play piano? Everyone has different talents and abilities — let's share and celebrate our many talents!


Arto's Big Move. Monica Arnaldo, $18.95

Arto has lived his whole life in the snowy, cold North. When his mom gets a new job and the family prepares to spend a year in the South, Arto is not happy at all. He's just going to act as if there isn't any difference. But when Arto makes a new friend, Ana, he slowly sheds his layers and discovers that it's not such a bad idea to adapt to your surroundings. When his year in the South is over, Arto understands there is a way to cope with another move while keeping the memory of his Southern adventure alive. A relatable story with a memorable character, Arto's Big Move uses a gentle touch to convey an important message about adapting to change.


Your Fantastic Elastic Brain: Stretch It, Shape It. JoAnn Deak, illustrated by Sarah Ackerley, $26.95

This innovative and timely picture book teaches children that they have the ability to stretch and grow their own brains. It also delivers the crucial message that mistakes are an essential part of learning. The book introduces children to the anatomy and various functions of the brain in a fun and engaging way.


If Kids Ran the World. Leo & Diane Dillon, $20.99

All roads lead to kindness in this powerful final collaboration between two-time Caldecott Medalists Leo and Diane Dillon. In a colorful tree house, a rainbow of children determine the most important needs in our complex world. Kids bring abundant food to the hungry; medicine and cheer to the sick; safe housing, education, and religious tolerance to all; and our planet is treated with care. Forgiveness and generosity are seen as essential, because kids know how to share, and they understand the power of love. A tribute to peace and a celebration of diverse cultures, this captures the wondrous joy of all people, and the unique beauty within each one of us shines forth.


If Kids Ruled the World. Linda Bailey & David Huyck, $18.95 (ages 3-7)

This original, fun picture book delightfully describes, in hilarious detail, a small child's idea of utopia! Recess school? Cake for breakfast? Tree houses for everyone? If it's fun and playful, then your wish is granted!


If My Mom Were a Platypus: Mammal Babies and Their Mothers. Dia Michels, $13.95

The animal kingdom offers a special fascination for children because so many of the cozy rituals they share at home are echoed in nature. All mammal mothers feed, protect, and teach their young, tasks that often challenge their own needs for survival. With beautiful illustrations and inventive text, this fascinating introduction reveals how fourteen mammal babies travel the path from helpless infant to self-sufficient adults.


Mr. Wayne's Masterpiece. Patricia Polacco, $19.99

In this book, Patricia Polacco addresses a common fear — speaking in front of an audience. Mr. Wayne's Masterpiece celebrates the lifelong impact of a great teacher, and how a moment of courage can change everything.


Magnetic Poetry Kids' French Kit. $17.95

Created with the help of native speakers and language educators, the Magnetic Poetry Kids' French Kit is a fun and friendly way to help immerse garcons et filles en Francais. Each tile is printed on both sides and sticks both ways, with a French word on one side and its English translation on the other. Great for adults, too!


I Am Mixed. Garcelle Beauvais & Sebastien Jones, illustrated by James Webster, $17.95

Jay and Nia are the children of two worlds, and as they will discover, they can enjoy the best of both. From Mommy's jazz beats to Daddy's classical piano, we will dance with the twins through a book that explores what it is to be of mixed ancestry, proving that a child is more than the sum of their parents.


Here I Am. Patti Kim, $8.95

Newly arrived from their faraway homeland, a boy and his family enter into the lights, noise, and traffic of a busy American city in this dazzling wordless picture book. The language is unfamiliar. Food, habits, games, and gestures are puzzling. They boy clings tightly to his special keepsake from home and wonders how he will find his way. How will he once again become the happy, confident kid he used to be? Walk in his shoes as he takes the first tentative steps toward discovering joy in his new world. A poignant and affirming view of the immigrant experience.


The Most Magnificent Thing. Ashley Spires, $16.95

A young girl has a wonderful idea. She is going to make the most MAGNIFICENT thing! She knows just how it will look. She knows just how it will work. All she has to do is make it, and she makes things all the time. Easy-peasy! But making her magnificent thing is anything but easy, and the girl tries and fails, repeatedly. Eventually, the girl gets really, really mad. She is so mad, in fact, that she quits. But after her dog convinces her to take a walk, she comes back to her project with renewed enthusiasm and manages to get it just right. 

For the early grades' exploration of character education, this funny book offers a perfect example of the rewards of perseverance and creativity. The girl's frustration and anger are vividly depicted in the detailed art, and the story offers good options for dealing honestly with these feelings, while at the same time reassuring children that it's okay to make mistakes.


Grandpa's Girls. Nicola Campbell & Kim LaFave, $16.95

A young girl delights in a visit to her grandpa’s farm. She and her cousins run through the fields, explore the root cellar where the salmon and jars of fruit are stored, swing on a rope out the barn loft window, visit the Appaloosa in the corral and tease the neighbor’s pig. The visit is also an opportunity for this child to ask Grandpa what her grandmother, Yayah, was like, and explore the “secret room,” with its old wooden trunk of ribbons, medals and photos of Grandpa in uniform. There is a wonderful blend of fun and family history in this visit to a grandparent, but also the realization that there can be some things about the people we know and love that will always remain a mystery.


Secrets of the Garden: Food Chains and the Food Web in Our Backyard. Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld, illustrated by Priscilla Lamont, $8.99

One small garden holds many wonders: plants growing, bugs nibbling, birds swooping, and so much more. Find out how they are all connected in this fun and information-packed book. Perfect for spring planting season — an outstanding book about backyard science the whole family will appreciate.


Naked! Michael Ian Black, Illustrated by Debbie Ridpath Ohi,  $19.99

After his bath, a little boy begins his hilarious dash around the house... in the buff! Being naked is great. Running around, sliding down the stairs, eating cookies. Nothing could be better. Unless he had a cape!


HAITI My Country: Poems by Haitian Schoolchildren. Illustrated by Rogé, $14.95

For several months, Quebec illustrator Rogé prepared a series of portraits of Haitian children. Students of Camp Perrin wrote the accompanying poems, which create, with flowing consistency, Haiti, my country. These teenaged poets use the Haitian landscape as their easel. The nature that envelops them is quite clearly their main subject. While misery often storms through Haiti in the form of earthquakes, cyclones, or floods, these young men and women see their surrounding nature as assurance for a joyful, confident future.


It's About Time: Untangling Everything You Need to Know about Time. Pascale Estellon, $18.95

One second, one minute, one hour, one day, one week, one month, one year... this fun book explains it all!


Daisy's Biggest Success. Harriet Zaidman, illustrated by Sarah Neville, $21.95

Daisy the dog loves jumping on the couch, but her people don't like the hair she leaves behind. When they start piling books on the couch to keep her away, Daisy knocks them off — and that leads her to adventures she never imagined!


Grappling with the Grumblies. Deborah Fannie Miller, illustrated by Diane Jacobs, $12.95

When Jessie woke up, everything got GRUMPY! Just try getting ready for school with a big Grumblie in your way — and with every grumpy word and action, the Grumblie grows until there's no room for Jessie. Finally, with Mom's help, Jessie wiggles and giggles those Grumblies away.


Thanks for the Feedback. Julia Cook, illustrated by Kelsey De Weerd, $14.95

A story about accepting criticism and compliments —– the right way!


The Sissy Duckling. Harvey Fierstein, Illustrated by Henry Cole, $11.99

Elmer is not like the other boy ducklings. While they like to build forts, he loves to bake cakes. While they like to play baseball, he wants to put on the halftime show. Elmer is a great big sissy. But when his father is wounded by a hunter’s shot, Elmer proves that the biggest sissy can also be the greatest hero.

Acclaimed actor and playwright Harvey Fierstein has crafted a heartwarming story, based on his award-winning HBO animated special, about learning to embrace the special qualities we all possess. Henry Cole’s gently humorous illustrations give it a new vitality. This is a book to share with all children, to help them understand that each one of them is unique and valuable.


The Sky of Afghanistan. Ana Eulate & Sonja Wimmer, $16.95

Beautifully illustrated and undeniably moving, this is the story of a little Afghan girl’s dreams of peace. As her country is wracked by war, a girl’s imagination drifts toward the idea of peace for her people and for her country. Her powerful dreams soon take wing and fill the homes and hearts of those around her, uniting a people in their common desire for peace.


This Moose Belongs to Me. Oliver Jeffers, $9.99

Wilfred owned a moose … or at least — he THOUGHT he did…


Ink-Blot. Maria Eugenia, $15.95

Some girls think they are badly drawn. They worry about their height, their hair, their size. Some worry about everything. That’s a lot of stress. But Ink-Blot? She doesn’t care how she’s drawn — she’s too busy having fun!


Desmond and the Very Mean Word. Desmond Tutu & Douglas Carlton Abrams, illustrated by A.G. Ford, $18.00

When Desmond takes his new bicycle out for a ride through his neighborhood, his pride and joy turn to hurt and anger when a group of boys shout a very mean word at him. He first responds by shouting an insult, but soon discovers that fighting back with mean words doesn’t make him feel any better. With the help of kindly Father Trevor, Desmond comes to understand his conflicted feelings and see that all people deserve compassion, whether or not they say they are sorry. Brought to vivid life in A. G. Ford’s energetic illustrations, this heartfelt, relatable story conveys timeless wisdom about how to handle bullying and angry feelings, while seeing the good in everyone.


Kenta and the Big Wave. Ruth Ohi, $9.95

When tragedy strikes Kenta’s small village in Japan, he does all he can to hang on to the things that matter to him most. But amidst the chaos of an emergency evacuation brought on by the tsunami, Kenta and his family must quickly leave their home, taking with them only the barest necessities. Climbing to safer ground, Kenta watches helplessly as his prized soccer ball goes bouncing down a hill and gets swept away by the waves, never to be seen again… that is until it washes up on a beach on the other side of the world, into the hands of a child who takes it upon himself to return the ball to its rightful owner.


There Were Monkeys in My Kitchen. Sheree Fitch, illustrated by Sydney Smith, $12.95

Willa Wellowby's house has been overrun by monkeys. They're ballet dancing, playing the bagpipes, listening to the Beatles, and causing mayhem and destruction all over the house and yard. And the more Willa asks them to leave, the more havoc they wreak. She calls the police, the RCMP, the FBI, and Scotland Yard to get rid of these monkeys...but when the Mounties finally show up, it's Willa who's in trouble!


The Blessing Cup. Patricia Polacco, $19.99

As a young Russian Jewish girl in the early 1900s, Anna and her family lived in fear of the Czar’s soldiers. The family lived a hard life and had few possessions — their treasure was a beautiful china tea set. A wedding gift to Anna’s parents, the tea set came with a wish that “Anyone who drinks from this will have blessings from God. They will never know a day of hunger. Their lives will always have flavor. They will know love and joy and they will never be poor.”

When Anna’s family leaves Russia for America, they bring the tea set and its blessings. A source of heritage and security, the tea set helps Anna’s family make friends and find better lives in America. A cup from the tea set — The Blessing Cup — became an anchor of family history, and it remains a symbol of lasting love more than a century later. This tender tribute to the importance of loving lineage is a prequel and companion to the perennial bestseller The Keeping Quilt and is told and illustrated with authenticity and tremendous heart.


Scholastic Children’s French-English Visual Dictionary. Scholastic Canada, $12.99

With thousands of words on a variety of topics, the SCHOLASTIC CHILDREN'S FRENCH-ENGLISH VISUAL DICTIONARY provides a comprehensive guide to common words in French and English. Bright, modern illustrations featuring engaging characters and familiar topics are labeled in both languages. Each word pair has been selected by expert lexical translators and language consultants.

This dictionary covers a wide range of subjects — from food and clothing to plants and animals, and even outer space! It also includes an introduction to the language and information on how to get the most out of the dictionary, as well as pages on opposites, numbers, time, and calendar words, plus full indexes in both French and English — perfect for 6- to 9-year-olds who are learning and using French!


Mr. Zinger’s Hat. Cary Fagan, illustrated by Dušan Petričić, $17.95


Shark vs. Train. Chris Barton & Tom Lichtenheld, $19.99

If you think Superman vs. Batman would be an exciting matchup, wait until you see Shark vs. Train. In this hilarious and wacky picture book, Shark and Train egg each other on for one competition after another, including burping, bowling, Ping Pong...


The ABCs of Yoga for Kids. Teresa Power & Kathleen Rietz, $25.95

A gentle introduction to simple yoga postures for young children, this beautifully illustrated book is as much fun to read as it is to do the poses.

Also available:

The ABCs of Yoga for Kids: 56 Learning Cards. Teresa Power & Kathleen Rietz, $21.50 (ages 3-8)


In Lucia’s Neighborhood. Pat Shewchuk & Marek Colek, $18.95

After learning about urban visionary Jane Jacobs, seven-year-old Lucia takes a closer look at what makes her city neighborhood special. Is it the park where people jog, play with their dogs, practice Tai Chi? Is it the shops along the main street? Or is it the festivals, the people, the front yards with their flowers, the neighbors, the farmers’ market?

Illustrating the many ways people work together to make their communities vibrant and thriving, IN LUCIA’S NEIGHBORHOOD will inspire readers to join the performance of “the ballet of the good city sidewalk” in their own neighborhoods.


The Stone Hatchlings. Sarah Tsiang & Qin Leng, $9.95

With a crick and a crack, the pretend eggs Abby found in the backyard hatch to reveal two colourful chicks. Abby has great fun caring for and playing with them, until one day Abby decides it’s time to set them free.


Willow Finds a Way. Lana Button & Tania Howells, $18.95 (ages 4-6)

Willow’s bossy classmate makes everyone uncomfortable. Willow needs to find a way to say “NO!” to Kristabelle, once and for all.


When I Get Older: the Story Behind “Wavin’ Flag. K’naan, illustrated by Rudy Gutierrez, $19.99

K’nann tells the story of his early life in Mogadishu, Somalia, and of the difficulties of being a child refugee in a land far from home. This is the story that inspired K’naan’s famous anthem “Wavin’ Flag”, a song known the world over, that speaks of freedom and dignity.


peace. Wendy Anderson Halperin, $19.99

Radiating tenderness and reflecting the influence of eastern philosophies, a compilation of exquisite illustrations and wisely chosen words reveals the heart of where peace truly must originate: within ourselves. The beautifully intricate artwork, with tiny, precisely rendered details of life across the globe, complements the spare and powerful text that includes quotations from famous peacemakers.  Poetic and soothing, PEACE is a masterful exploration of the true path to world peace and serves as a perfect springboard to discussions about bullying, conflict resolution, and right actions.


Toes in My Nose and Other Poems. Sheree Fitch, illustrated by Sydney Smith, $19.95

Silly, funny, and outrageous, from Popcorn Pete and Mabel Murple to Zelba Zinnamon, these are some of the best-loved poems and characters in Canadian children’s literature.

In this 25th anniversary edition, award-winning illustrator Sydney Smith’s new illustrations hilariously portray a neighbourhood of kids flying to the moon, playing banjo with orangutans, and bathing with submarines. TOES IN MY NOSE will introduce a whole new generation to Sheree Fitch’s magnificent feat of imagination.


Kayak Girl. Monica Devine, illustrated by Mindy Dwyer, $15.50

A young girl learns to cope with loss with the help of her grandfather, and memories of her mother.


The Magic Clothesline. Andrée Poulin, Illustrated by Marion Arbona, $10.95

Robin is sad! His dad is away on a business trip and will miss his birthday. But then magical things start to happen that help Robin to feel better. This delightful story is about brotherly love, the tight bond of family and learning to deal with the challenges of short family separations.


My Brave Year of Firsts: Tries, Sighs, and High Fives. Jamie Lee Curtis, Illustrated by Laura Cornell, $21.00

MY BRAVE YEAR OF FIRSTS celebrates the extraordinary, everyday bravery of trying new things for the very first time. Whether Frankie's learning to ride a bike, love her first dog, make new friends (her very first twins), or help out her dad, she discovers that trying new things is how she grows — and that being brave enough to do so is what growing up is all about.


The Boy Who Grew Flowers. Jen Wojtowicz, Illustrated by Steve Adams, $8.99 (ages 4 to 10)

Rink is a very unusual boy who grows beautiful flowers all over his body whenever the moon is full. Rink and his family are treated as outcasts even though no one knows his strange botanical secret. But one day a new girl arrives at school, and Rink discovers she has some unique qualities of her own.


Something from Nothing. Phoebe Gilman, $7.99

When Joseph was a baby, his grandfather made him a wonderful blanket to keep him warm and cozy. But Joseph grew older, and the blanket grew older too …


AlphaOops! The Day Z Went First.  Alethea Kontis, illustrated by Bob Kolar, $8.00 (ages 4 – 8)

Filled with visually humorous details, Bob Kolar's colorful illustrations are the perfect foil for Alethea Kontis's snappy story about the comic confusion that comes when the letters of the alphabet, like a class of unruly children, step out of order and show that each one has a mind of its own. It's backwards! It's inside out! It's every letter for itself! This laugh-out-loud romp is not your average alphabet book.


The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore. William Joyce & Joe Bluhm, $19.99

Morris Lessmore loved words. He loved stories. He loved books. Then one day, everything in Morris’s life, including his own story, is scattered to the winds and what follows is a story Morris could never have imagined. Visually stunning, this captivating story is destined to become a classic.


The Pirate Girl's Treasure: an Origami Adventure. Peyton Leung & Hilary Leung, $10.95

It's a pirate adventure! It's a treasure hunt! It's an origami how-to adventure! It's a lot of fun!


Vote for ME! Ben Clanton, $18.95

The competition is fierce. Who will you vote for — and more importantly — who will win? This is a delightful book about how easily competiveness can get out of hand.


Up Home. Shauntay Grant & Susan Tooke, $12.95

Happy memories sparkle in this journey through poet Shauntay Grant's childhood visits to North Preston, Nova Scotia. The sights, sounds, rhythms and people of one of Canada's most important black communities are captured in the warm and vibrant illustrations of by Susan Tooke.


Take Time to Relax! Nancy Carlson, $12.50 (ages 5-8)

Tina the beaver and her family constantly rush off in different directions, until a storm keeps them snowbound at home.


I Will Not Read this Book. Cece Meng, illustrated Joy Ang, $23.99

It's much more fun to read this book with someone you love!


MOOSE! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

There’s a moose in the backyard! Luke’s Mom and Dad want to shoo it away, but the moose has other plans …


Reading Makes You Feel Good. Todd Parr, $9.00

What can reading do for you today?


Give Me Back My Dad! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

Cheryl and her dad know the very best spot for ice fishing. But they’d better watch out — because the fish have other plans!


The Great Big Book of Families. Mary Hoffman & Ros Asquith, $20.50

What’s your family like?

This book explores every aspect of family life with warmth, wit and sensitivity. The Great Big Book of Families is a great big treat for every family to share.


The Enemy: a Book about Peace. Davide Cali, illustrated by Serge Bloch, $19.99

There is a battlefield. In the battlefield there are two holes. In each hole there is a soldier.

Simple, direct and powerful, this is a timeless story about the pointlessness of war.


Too Much Stuff! Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko, $7.99

One backpack full of toys plus one airplane ride equals a crazy adventure for Temina and her Mom.


Not All Princesses Dress in Pink. Jane Yolen & Heidi Stemple, Illustrated by Anne-Sophie Languetin, $21.99

These princesses don’t let fancy clothes get in their way. They dig in the dirt, kick soccer balls and splash in muddy puddles and they’re dressed for play!


Owls See Clearly at Night: a Michif Alphabet. Julie Flett, $18.95

From Atayookee! To Lii Zyeu — an introduction to the Michif language of the Métis people.


Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I Don’t). Barbara Bottner, illustrated by Michael Emberley, $22.99

A librarian and a contrarian face off in this tale of a reluctant reader.


Perfect Snow. Barbara Reid, $19.99

Barbara Reid’s beautiful art depicts the joy and exhilaration that comes with the first true snowfall of winter.


Who Is In Your Family? A Celebration in Diversity. Susan Bowman, illustrated by Poppy Moon, $21.95 (ages 4-8)

In this full-color, illustrated book, children describe their families including what they like to do together. The wonderfully illustrated drawings bring out the uniqueness of each family. Children are encouraged to describe their own families and create some fun activities they can do together. Some of the families described include:

Parent in the military • Single parent • Incarcerated parent •Adoptive parents •Foster parents • Multicultural parents •Same-sex parents •Terminally ill parents • and others …


Celebrate Ramadan & Eid Al-Fitr with Praying, Fasting and Charity. Deborah Heiligman, $7.95

Celebrate Ramadan & Eid Al-Fitr is illustrated with beautiful full-colour photos of children and families around the world as they fast, pry and celebrate during this holy time of the year. National Geographic’s Holidays around the World is a diverse, informative series that introduces children to a varied selection of religious and cultural holidays presented from a global perspective.


Stella, Star of the Sea.  Marie-Louise Gay, $7.95

Stella and her little brother Sam are spending the day at the sea. Stella has been to the sea before and knows all the secrets!


Bippity Bop Barbershop. Natasha Anastasia Tarpley, illustrated by E. B. Lewis, $7.99 (ages 4-9)

Delightful watercolour illustrations, cheerful depictions of community and family – this warm, reassuring story beautifully depicts a special ritual between father and son.


My People. Langston Hughes, photography by Charles R. Smith Jr., $21.00

Langston Hughes’ classic, simple poem My People is brought to life with the beautiful portrait photography of poet, writer, activist and photographer Charles R. Smith, Jr.


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