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Featured Books

Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us about Raising Successful Children. Roberta Michnick Golinkoff & Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, $26.95

In just a few years, today's children and teens will forge careers that look nothing like those their parents and grandparents knew. Even the definition of "career" and "job" are changing as more people build their own teams to create new businesses, apps, and services. So what can we do to help our children be brilliant and successful? Authors Roberta Michnick Golinkoff and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek provide a science-based framework for how we should be educating children in and outside of school.

Constructed from the latest scientific evidence and presented in an accessible way rich with examples, this book introduces the 6Cs — collaboration, communication, content, critical thinking, creative innovation, and confidence — along with tips to optimize children's development in each area.

Taken together, these are the skills that will make up the straight-A report card for success in the 21st century.


Beyond Intelligence: Secrets for Raising Happily Productive Kids. Dona Matthews & Joanne Foster, $19.95

What is intelligence? Is it really a have or have not proposition, as we’ve been led to believe? Are some children just destined to fall behind? Dona Matthews and Joanne Foster answer those questions with a resounding “No!” In Beyond Intelligence, they demonstrate that every child has the ability to succeed — with the right support and guidance. But how can parents provide that support? Matthews and Foster proceed from the assumption that knowledge is power, offering parents an information-packed guide to identifying a child’s ability, fostering creativity, and bolstering effort and persistence.

Using case studies and anecdotes from their personal and professional experience, they explore different ways of learning; the links between creativity and intelligence; and how to best to provide emotional and social supports. They offer critical advice on how to work co-operatively with schools and educators, and address how to embrace failures as learning opportunities. Drawing on the latest research in brain development and education theory, Beyond Intelligence is a must-read for today’s parents and educators.


Beyond the Label: a Guide to Unlocking a Child's Educational Potential. Karen Schlitz, $27.95

When a child is struggling with a learning disability or behavioral disorder, it can be overwhelming for their parents, who often do not know what to do or where to turn for help. This superb guide shows you how to obtain the necessary assessment(s) that will help you to better understand a child's strengths and weaknesses. It also describes what an educational "accommodation" is and how it can serve as a bridge to learning. Every child has the legal right to fully access the learning environment and to show what they truly know when taking tests. The authors describe how accommodations specifically target a child's weaknesses in order to level the playing field in the classroom and during test taking situations. Accommodations can be as simple as giving the child extra time to finish a test or allowing them to take a test in a smaller group to minimize distractions. In addition, this handbook outlines the relevant research to help you understand the big picture of a child's learning and emotional needs.

The authors offer extensive discussion of issues such as attention and concentration, memory, executive functioning, language, visual perception and processing, emotional functioning, and social skills. Throughout, they stress that, by focusing on behaviors and not labels, you will be able to better understand the "what, why, and how" of a child's learning and emotional challenges.

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Boys and Girls Learn Differently: a Guide for Teachers and Parents. Michael Gurian, $22.95

Author Michael Gurian has revised and updated his groundbreaking book that clearly demonstrated how the distinction in hard-wiring and socialized gender differences affects how boys and girls learn. Gurian presents a proven method to educate our children based on brain science, neurological development, and chemical and hormonal disparities. This edition includes new information on a wealth of topics including:

  • How to design the ultimate classroom for kids in elementary, secondary, middle, and high school
  • The inherent differences between the developmental neuroscience of boys and girls
  • How the brain learns
  • When same sex classrooms are appropriate, and when they’re not

Count Girls In: Empowering Girls to Combine Any Interests with STEM to Open Up a World of Opportunity. Karen Panetta & Katianne Williams, $22.99

Count Girls In asserts there is a place for all girls and young women — not just the science fair winners and robotics club members — in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, if we can keep their (and our) minds and options open and meet them where they are.

To succeed in STEM fields today, girls don’t have to change who they are. A girl who combines her natural talents, interests, and dreams with STEM skills has a greater shot than ever before at a career she loves and a salary she deserves. Count Girls In encourages parents and other adults to raise authentic young women who have the confidence to put STEM to work in a way that best serves them and their passions. The authors, both STEM professionals, present compelling research in a conversational, accessible style and provide specific advice and takeaways for each stage of schooling, from elementary school through college, followed by comprehensive STEM resources. This isn’t a book about raising competitive, test-acing girls in lab coats; this is about raising happy, confident girls who realize the world of opportunities before them.


The Curiosity of School: Education and the Dark Side of Enlightenment. Zander Sherman, $32.00

It’s one thing we all have in common. We’ve all been to school. But as Zander Sherman shows in this fascinating, often shocking account of institutionalized education, sending your kids off to school was not always normal. In fact, school is a very recent invention.

With clarity, detachment, and wry humour, Sherman presents the story of school through the stories of its most influential — and peculiar — reformers. Provocative, entertaining — and even educational — THE CURIOSITY OF SCHOOL lays bare the forces that shape the institution that shapes all of us.

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The Educated Child: Parent's Guide — from Preschool through Eighth Grade. William Bennett, et al, $33.99

THE EDUCATED CHILD defines a good education and offers parents a plan of action for ensuring that their children achieve it. It sets forth clear curricula and specific objectives for children from kindergarten through the eighth grade, including:

  • What children should be studying and the kind of work they should be doing
  • Important facts to learn and essential reading lists
  • When children should master specific math skills, spelling and grammar basics, and scientific facts
  • Test preparation, homework, and other areas that require parental involvement

THE EDUCATED CHILD also examines timely issues such as school choice, sex education, character education, and the phonics/whole language debate. Perhaps most important, it encourages parents to become advocates for their children by learning what to look for in a good school, how to talk to educators, and how, when necessary, to push for needed changes. For parents concerned about their children's current education and future lives, it is the ultimate handbook.


Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, et al, $19.50

Drawing on overwhelming scientific evidence from their own studies and the collective research results of child development experts, and addressing the key areas of development, the authors explain the process of learning from a child’s point of view. The book also offers parents 40 age-appropriate games for creative play. These simple, fun, yet powerful exercises work as well or better than expensive high-tech gadgets to teach a child what his ever-active, playful mind is craving to learn.


The End of Ignorance: Multiplying Our Human Potential. John Mighton, $29.95

The End of Ignorance conceives of a world in which no child is left behind–a world based on the assumption that each child has the potential to be successful in every subject. John Mighton argues that by recognizing the barriers that we have experienced in our own educational development, by identifying the moment that we became disenchanted with a certain subject and forever closed ourselves off to it, we will be able to eliminate these same barriers from standing in the way of our children.

A passionate examination of our present education system, The End of Ignorance shows how we all can work together to reinvent the way that we are taught.

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Enriching the Brain: How to Maximize Every Learner's Potential. Eric Jensen, $20.99

Eric Jensen, a leading expert in the translation of brain research into education, argues in ENRICHING THE BRAIN that we greatly underestimate students’ achievement capacity. Drawing from a wide range of neuroscience research as well as related studies, Jensen offers us a powerful new understanding of how the brain can be “enriched,” across the board to maximize learning, memory, behavior and overall function. The bottom line is we have far more to do with how our children’s brains turn out than we previously thought.

ENRICHING THE BRAIN shows that lasting brain enrichment doesn’t occur randomly through routine or ordinary learning. It requires specific and persistent experiences that amount to a “formula” for maximizing brain potential. Offering an inspiring and innovative set of practices for promoting enrichment in the home, the school, and the classroom, this book is a clarion call. All of us, from teachers to parents to policymakers must take their role as ‘brain shapers’ much more seriously and this book gives the tools with which to do it.


The Essential Conversation: What Parents and Teachers Can Learn from Each Other. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, $19.00

Through vivid portraits and parables, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot captures the dynamics of this complex, intense relationship from the perspective of both parents and teachers. She identifies new principles and practices for improving family-school relationships in a voice that combines the passion of a mother, the skepticism of a social scientist, and the keen understanding of one of an experienced educator.

For parents and teachers who seek productive dialogues and collaborative alliances in support of the learning and growth of their children, this book will offer valuable insights, incisive lessons, and deft guidance on how to communicate more effectively. In The Essential Conversation, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot brings scholarship, warmth, and wisdom to an immensely important cultural subject — the way we raise our children.


The Essential 55: an Award-Winning Educator's Rules for Discovering the Successful Student in Every Child. Ron Clark, $21.00

The Essential 55 is a collection of the amazingly effective rules that Ron Clark used to become an extraordinary teacher. Through trial and error, he has distilled ideas that have helped him take apathetic students and transform them into scholars. Covering all aspects of life, from the classroom to the real world, from daily human interactions to cafeteria and bathroom manners, Clark has captured the imagination of students, educators and parents alike with his wit, wisdom and humour.

The Essential 55 Workbook: Everything You Need to Help Your Child Succeed in School. Ron Clark, $20.99

Based on the bestseller The Essential 55, this workbook will provide the tools any parent or teacher needs to show a child how to act with consideration and respect… every one of Ron Clark's 55 rules is outlined here, with specific and fun suggestions to help kids understand why each one is important.

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The Everything STEM Handbook: Help Your Child Learn and Succeed in the Fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Rihab Sawah & Anthony Clark, $19.99

The STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math) are top education priorities in the United States — and they are growing fields with a high demand for jobs. If you want to make sure your children are prepared for the future in these fields, here's how you can help: Make it fun! Expose them to hands-on, real-world, and fun activities so they'll become engaged, motivated, and successful students later on.


The Excellent 11: Qualities Teachers and Parents Use to Motivate, Inspire and Educate Children. Ron Clark, $19.50

After publishing his New York Times bestseller The Essential 55, award-winning teacher Ron Clark took his rules on the road. He met amazing teachers, administrators, students, parents — all kinds of people involved in bringing up great kids. In the best of them, he noticed the same qualities that he'd observed in many of the outstanding individuals he'd worked with during his time teaching in North Carolina and Harlem.

In THE EXCELLENT 11, Ron Clark pinpoints these qualities and shows how to apply them to both educating children and becoming a great teacher or parent. You’ll find out what the characteristics are, why they work, and how you can incorporate them into your classroom, home, and life. As he did with The Essential 55, Ron has filled this book with hundreds of suggestions, stories, and wonderfully funny anecdotes.


Feel-Bad Education and Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling. Alfie Kohn, $17.00

A new book from one of the most outspoken and incisive thinkers in education, FEEL-BAD EDUCATION is a call to parents and educators to rethink our priorities and reconsider our practices. Alfie Kohn repeatedly invites us to think more deeply about the conventional wisdom. Is self-discipline always desirable he asks? Does academic cheating necessarily indicate a moral failing? Might inspirational posters commonly found on school walls reflect disturbing assumptions about children? Could the use of rubrics for evaluating student learning prove counterproductive?

Subjecting young children to homework, grades, or standardized tests-merely because these things will be required of them later-reminds Kohn of Monty Python's "getting hit on the head lessons." And, with tongue firmly in cheek, he declares that we should immediately begin teaching twenty-second-century skills.

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Frames of Mind: the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, Revised Edition. Howard Gardner, $23.00

First published in 1983, Gardner's trailblazing book revolutionized the worlds of education and psychology by positing that rather than a single type of intelligence, we have several — most of which are neglected by standard testing and educational methods. In this updated edition, Howard Gardner reflects on thirty years of work on Multiple Intelligence theory and practice.



Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life. Peter Gray, $21.00

In Free to Learn, developmental psychologist Peter Gray argues that in order to foster children who will thrive in today's constantly changing world, we must entrust them to steer their own learning and development. Drawing on evidence from anthropology, psychology, and history, he demonstrates that free play is the primary means by which children learn to control their lives, solve problems, get along with peers, and become emotionally resilient.

A brave, counterintuitive proposal for freeing our children from the shackles of the curiosity-killing institution we call school, Free to Learn suggests that it's time to stop asking what's wrong with our children, and start asking what's wrong with the system. It shows how we can act — both as parents and as members of society — to improve children's lives and to promote their happiness and learning. 


The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed. Jessica Lahey, $19.99

Modern parenting is defined by an unprecedented level of overprotectiveness — parents now rush to school to deliver forgotten assignments, challenge teachers on report card disappointments, mastermind children's friendships, and interfere on the playing field. As teacher, journalist, and parent Jessica Lahey explains, even though these parents see themselves as being highly responsive to their children's well-being, they aren't giving them the chance to experience failure — or the opportunity to learn to solve their own problems.

Everywhere she turned, Lahey saw an obvious and startling fear of failure, in both her students and in her own children. This fear has the potential to undermine children's autonomy, competence, motivation, and their relationships with the adults in their lives. Providing a clear path toward solutions, Lahey lays out a blueprint with targeted advice for handling homework, report cards, social dynamics, and sports. Most important, she sets forth a plan to help parents learn to step back and embrace their children's setbacks along with their successes.

Empathetic and wise, The Gift of Failure is essential reading for parents, educators, and psychologists nationwide who want to help children thrive — and grow into independent, confident adults.

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How Your Child Learns Best: Brain-Friendly Strategies You Can Use to Ignite Your Child's Learning and Increase School Success. Judy Willis, $32.99

HOW YOUR CHILD LEARNS BEST shows you not only how to help your child learn schoolwork, but also how to capitalize on the way your child's brain learns best in order to enrich education wherever you are, from the grocery store to the car - a necessity in today's "teach to the test" world. By using everyday household items and enjoyable activities, parents of children ages three to twelve can apply targeted strategies (based on age and learning strength) in key academic areas. Discover how to help your child increase academic focus and success, lower test stress while increasing test scores, increase class participation, foster creativity, and improve attention span, memory, and higher-level thinking.


In Their Own Way: Discovering and Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style. Thomas Armstrong, $17.00

Children learn in multiple ways, and educator Thomas Armstrong has shown hundreds of thousands of parents and teachers how to locate those unique areas in each of our children where learning and creativity seem to flow with special vigor. In this fully updated classic on multiple intelligences, Armstrong sheds new light on the "eight ways to bloom," or the eight kinds of "multiple intelligences." While everyone possesses all eight intelligences, Armstrong delineates how to discover your child's particular areas of strength among them. Filled with resources for the home and classroom, this new edition of IN THEIR OWN WAY offers inspiration for every learning situation.


Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Cultures Count. Richard Nisbett, $22.50

Intelligence and How to Get It asserts that intellect is not primarily genetic but is principally determined by societal influences. Nisbett's commanding argument, superb marshaling of evidence and fearless discussions of the controversial carve out new and exciting terrain in this hotly debated field.

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Lighting Their Fires: Raising Extraordinary Children. Rafe Esquith, $18.00

In Lighting Their Fires, educator Rafe Esquith shows that children aren’t born extraordinary; they become that way as a result of parents and teachers who instill values that serve them not just for school, but for the rest of their lives.

Whether he is highlighting the importance of time management or offering a step-by-step discussion of how children can become good decision makers, Esquith shows how parents can equip their kids with all the tools they need to find success and have fun in the process. Using examples from classic films and great books, he stresses the value of sacrifice, the importance of staying true to oneself, and the danger that television can pose to growing young minds. Lighting Their Fires explains not just how to make our children great students, but how to make them thoughtful and honorable people.


Making Makers: Kids, Tools, and the Future of Innovation. AnnMarie Thomas, $27.95

This is a book for parents and educators — both formal and informal, who are curious about the intersections of learning and making. Through stories, research, and data, it builds the case for why it is crucial to encourage today’s youth to be makers — to see the world as something they are actively helping to create. For those who are new to the Maker Movement, some history and introduction is given as well as practical advice for getting kids started in making. For those who are already familiar with the Maker Movement, this book provides biographical information about many of the “big names” and unsung heroes of the Maker Movement while also highlighting many of the attributes that make this a movement that so many people are passionate about.


Meet the Teacher: How to Help Your Child Navigate Elementary School, a Common Sense Guide for Parents.Betty Borowski & Laura Mayne, $19.95

Practical advice parents need to help their child thrive at school.

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The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children. Suzanne Bouffard, $35.00

At the heart of this groundbreaking book are two urgent questions: What do our young children need in the earliest years of school, and how do we ensure that they all get it? Cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for all children to gain the academic and emotional skills they need to succeed later in life.  Children who attend quality pre-K programs have a host of positive outcomes including better language, literacy, problem-solving and math skills down the line, and they have a leg up on what appears to be the most essential skill to develop at age four: strong self-control. But even with this overwhelming evidence, early childhood education is at a crossroads in America. We know that children can and do benefit, but we also know that too many of our littlest learners don’t get that chance — millions of parents can’t find spots for their children, or their preschoolers end up in poor quality programs.

With engrossing storytelling, journalist Suzanne Bouffard takes us inside some of the country’s best pre-K classrooms to reveal the sometimes surprising ingredients that make them work — and to understand why some programs are doing the opposite of what is best for children. It also chronicles the stories of families and teachers from many backgrounds as they struggle to give their children a good start in school. This book is a call to arms when we are at a crucial moment, and perhaps on the verge of a missed opportunity: We now have the means and the will to have universal pre-kindergarten, but we are also in grave danger of not getting it right.


Not in Our Classrooms: Why Intelligent Design is Wrong for Our Schools. Eugenie Scott & Glenn Branch, $14.00

Where did the concept of intelligent design originate? How does it connect with, and conflict with, various religious beliefs? Should we teach the controversy itself in our science classrooms? In clear and lively essays, a team of experts answers these questions and many more, describing the history of the intelligent design movement and the lack of scientific support for its claims. Most importantly, the contributors speak specifically to teachers and parents about the need to defend the integrity of science education by keeping intelligent design out of science curriculums. A concluding chapter offers concrete advice for those seeking to defend the teaching of evolution in their own communities.


The Organized Student: Teaching Children the Skills for Success in School and Beyond. Donna Goldberg, $18.99

Hands-on strategies for teaching your disorganized child how to organize for school success!

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The Parent Backpack for Kindergarten through Grade 5: How to Support Your Child’s Education, End Homework Meltdowns, and Build Parent-Teacher Connections. ML Nichols, $17.95

Finally, a book that gives parents the insights and strategies they need to build positive relationships with teachers and connect to their children’s learning in productive ways. How do you ensure your child gets the best education? Decades of research confirm that when parents engage with their children’s learning, kids do better in school — and life. This straight-talking guide helps you:

  • understand the critical role you play in your child’s education
  • connect with educators in respectful ways
  • encourage a love of reading in your kids
  • minimize homework meltdowns and disorganization
  • support students who struggle academically
  • help children navigate social situations and bullying
  • fuel your child’s mind and body for learning

Pushing the Limits: How Schools Can Prepare Our Children Today for the Challenges of Tomorrow. Kelly Gallagher-Mackay & Nancy Steinhauer, $32.95

Across Canada, a debate swirls around what our children will need to know in the face of huge technological, economic, social and political change. The question has become an ideological battleground, and there is a hunger for a deeper understanding of what we should be doing to prepare children now for the challenges of the future. This timely, important book is an answer to that call.

In Pushing the Limits, Kelly Gallagher-Mackay and Nancy Steinhauer draw on their experiences as educational leaders to reveal that the schools of the future exist in the here and now. They introduce us to extraordinary Canadian public schools, deeply rooted in their communities, that are fostering innovators, nimble problem-solvers and engaged citizens, boosting math comprehension, cultivating creativity and using technology to broaden the parameters of learning. And they explore why the role of schools is expanding to nurture students' social-emotional skills and growth mindsets, and how vital this broader definition of education is to children's long-term health, happiness and success. This book provides a vision of what schooling can and should look like in our rapidly shifting world and explores how we — parents and teachers — can realize this vision together.


The Schools Our Children Deserve: Moving Beyond Traditional Classrooms and 'Tougher Standards'. Alfie Kohn, $22.50

Alfie Kohn builds a powerful argument against the “back to basics” philosophy of teaching and simplistic demands to “raise the bar.” Drawing on stories from real classrooms and extensive research, Kohn shows parents, educators, and others interested in the debate how schools can help students explore ideas rather than filling them with forgettable facts and preparing them for standardized tests. Here at last is a book that challenges the two dominant forces in American education: an aggressive nostalgia for traditional teaching, and a heavy-handed push for tougher standards.

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7 Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Multiple Intelligences, Revised Edition. Thomas Armstrong, $17.50

Based on psychologist Howard Gardner's pioneering theory of "multiple intelligences," the original edition of 7 KINDS OF SMART identified seven distinct ways of being smart, including "word smart," "music smart," "logic smart," and "people smart." Now, with the addition of two new kinds of intelligence, Armstrong offers even more interesting information about how the human psyche functions. Complete with checklists for determining one's strongest and weakest intelligences, exercises, practical tips for developing each type of smart, a revised bibliography for further reading, and a guide to related Internet sites, this book continues to be an essential resource, offering cutting-edge research for general consumption.


Smart Moves: Why Learning Is Not All In Your Head, 2nd Edition. Carla Hannaford, $19.95

Neurophysiologist and educator Dr. Carla Hannaford brings the latest insights from scientific research to questions that affect learners of all ages. Examining the body's role in learning, from infancy through adulthood she presents the mounting scientific evidence that movement is crucial to learning. Dr. Hannaford offers clear alternatives and remedies that people can put into practice right away to make a real difference in their ability to learn. She advocates more enlightened educational practices for homes and schools including: a more holistic view of each learner; less emphasis on rote learning; more experiential, active instruction; less labeling of learning disabilities; more physical movement; more personal expression through arts, sports and music; less prescribing of Ritalin and other drugs whose long term effects are uncertain.


The Smarter Preschooler: Unlocking Your Child’s Intellectual Potential. Renee Mosiman & Mike Mosiman, $26.95

The Smarter Preschooler will show you how to develop an intellectually stimulating environment for your child while preserving the innocence of childhood.

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What Every Parent Should Know About School. Michael Reist, $19.99

School is our children's second home. They will spend more time there than anywhere else in their formative years. We all need to talk honestly about the nature of this environment, how it works, and how it doesn't work. Our kids are depending on us to create a school system where they can learn as well as feel happy. The more we know about how school works, the better we will be able to navigate our way through "the system" and help our children do the same. WHAT EVERY PARENT SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SCHOOL is an honest, positive, thought-provoking look at what schools are today and what they could be in the future.


What to Look for in a Classroom...and Other Essays. Alfie Kohn, $32.00

Through his writings and speeches, Alfie Kohn has been stirring up controversy for years, demonstrating how the conventional wisdom about education often isn't supported by the available research, and illuminating gaps between our long-term goals for students and what actually goes on in schools. From self-esteem to school uniforms, from grade inflation to character education, Kohn raises a series of provocative questions about the status quo in this collection of incisive essays. He challenges us to reconsider some of our most basic assumptions about children and education:

  • Can good values really be instilled in students?
  • What, if anything, lies behind the label of attention deficit disorder?
  • Are there solid data to support our skepticism about watching TV?
  • Might such allegedly enlightened practices as authentic assessment, logical consequences, and Total Quality education turn out to be detrimental?

Whether he is explaining why cooperative learning can be so threatening or why de-tracking is so fiercely opposed, Kohn offers a fresh, informed, and frequently disconcerting perspective on the major issues in education


What's Math Got to Do with It? Jo Boaler, $19.00

A critical read for teachers and parents who want to improve children’s mathematics learning, What’s Math Got to Do with It is “an inspiring resource” (Publishers Weekly). Featuring all the important advice and suggestions in the original edition, this revised edition is now updated with new research on the brain and mathematics that is revolutionizing scientists’ understanding of learning and potential.

As always, Jo Boaler presents research findings through practical ideas that can be used in classrooms and homes. The new What’s Math Got to Do with It prepares teachers and parents for the Common Core, shares Boaler’s work on ways to teach mathematics for a “growth mindset,” and includes a range of advice to inspire teachers and parents to give their students the best mathematical experience possible.

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Whole Child Education. John Miller, $25.95

Public education is often viewed as dominated by an emphasis on test scores and narrowly defined parameters of performance and achievement. By contrast, John Miller's Whole Child Education fosters relationships between various forms of thinking, links body and mind, and recognizes the inner life of the child.

Addressing issues of teaching, curriculum, the school, and teacher wellness, Miller presents three basic approaches (transmission, transaction, and transformation) that facilitate a connection with the whole student. Practical examples from teachers who have incorporated Miller's ideas into their own classrooms and descriptions of Toronto's Whole Child School (founded in 2009) illustrate how the 'Whole Curriculum' can be implemented on both the small and large scale. Inspired by the powerful vision of Martin Luther King and his concept of the Beloved Community, Whole Child Education is a vehicle for building community through holistic education.


Why Don’t Students Like School? A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions about How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom. Daniel Willingham, $24.95

Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham focuses his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning. His book reveals-the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences.

  • Nine, easy-to-understand principles with clear applications for the learning
  • Includes surprising findings, such as that intelligence is malleable, and that you cannot develop "thinking skills" without facts
  • How an understanding of the brain's workings can help teachers hone their teaching skills

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Complete Booklist

Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us about Raising Successful Children. Roberta Michnick Golinkoff & Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, $26.95

Beyond Intelligence: Secrets for Raising Happily Productive Kids. Dona Matthews &Joanne Foster, $19.95

Beyond the Label: a Guide to Unlocking a Child's Educational Potential. Karen Schlitz, $27.95

Boys and Girls Learn Differently: a Guide for Teachers and Parents. Michael Gurian, $22.95

Count Girls In: Empowering Girls to Combine Any Interests with STEM to Open Up a World of Opportunity. Karen Panetta & Katianne Williams, $22.99

The Curiosity of School: Education and the Dark Side of Enlightenment. Zander Sherman, $32.00

The Educated Child: Parent's Guide — from Preschool through Eighth Grade. William Bennett, et al, $33.99

Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, et al, $19.50

The End of Ignorance: Multiplying Our Human Potential. John Mighton, $29.95

Enriching the Brain: How to Maximize Every Learner's Potential. Eric Jensen, $20.99

The Essential Conversation: What Parents and Teachers Can Learn from Each Other. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, $19.00

The Essential 55: an Award-Winning Educator's Rules for Discovering the Successful Student in Every Child. Ron Clark, $21.00; Essential 55 Workbook, Ron Clark, $20.99

The Everything STEM Handbook: Help Your Child Learn and Succeed in the Fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Rihab Sawah & Anthony Clark, $19.99

The Excellent 11: Qualities Teachers and Parents Use to Motivate, Inspire and Educate Children. Ron Clark, $19.50

Feel-Bad Education and Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling. Alfie Kohn, $17.00

Frames of Mind: the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, Revised Edition. Howard Gardner, $23.00

Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life. Peter Gray, $21.00

The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed. Jessica Lahey, $19.99

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How Your Child Learns Best: Brain-Friendly Strategies You Can Use to Ignite Your Child's Learning and Increase School Success. Judy Willis, $32.99

In Their Own Way: Discovering and Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style. Thomas Armstrong, $17.00

Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Cultures Count. Richard Nisbett, $22.50

Lighting Their Fires: Raising Extraordinary Children. Rafe Esquith, $18.00

Making Makers: Kids, Tools, and the Future of Innovation. AnnMarie Thomas, $27.95

Meet the Teacher: How to Help Your Child Navigate Elementary School, a Common Sense Guide for Parents. Betty Borowski & Laura Mayne, $19.95

The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children. Suzanne Bouffard, $35.00

Not in Our Classrooms: Why Intelligent Design is Wrong for Our Schools. Eugenie Scott & Glenn Branch, $14.00

The Organized Student: Teaching Children the Skills for Success in School and Beyond. Donna Goldberg, $18.99

The Parent Backpack for Kindergarten through Grade 5: How to Support Your Child’s Education, End Homework Meltdowns, and Build Parent-Teacher Connections. ML Nichols, $17.95

Pushing the Limits: How Schools Can Prepare Our Children Today for the Challenges of Tomorrow. Kelly Gallagher-Mackay & Nancy Steinhauer, $32.95

The Schools Our Children Deserve: Moving Beyond Traditional Classrooms and 'Tougher Standards'. Alfie Kohn, $22.50

7 Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Multiple Intelligences, Revised Edition. Thomas Armstrong, $17.50

Smart Moves: Why Learning Is Not All In Your Head, 2nd Edition. Carla Hannaford, $19.95

The Smarter Preschooler: Unlocking Your Child's Intellectual Potential. Renee Mosiman & Mike Mosiman, $26.95

What Every Parent Should Know About School. Michael Reist, $19.99

What to Look for in a Classroom... and Other Essays. Alfie Kohn, $32.00

What's Math Got to Do with It? Jo Boaler, $19.00

Why Don't Students Like School? A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions about How the Mind Works and What That Means for the Classroom. Daniel Willingham, $24.95

Whole Child Education. John Miller, $25.95

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