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Achieving Aboriginal Student Success: a Guide for K to 8 Classrooms. Pamela Rose Toulouse, $29.00 

Achieving Aboriginal Student Success presents goals and strategies needed to support Aboriginal learners in the classroom. This book is for all teachers of kindergarten to grade 8 who have Aboriginal students in their classrooms or who are looking for ways to infuse an Aboriginal worldview into their curriculum. Although the author’s primary focus is the needs of Aboriginal students, the ideas are best practices that can be applied in classroom-management techniques, assessment tools, suggestions for connecting to the Aboriginal community, and much more. The strategies and information in this resource are about building bridges between cultures that foster respect, appreciation, and understanding.


Arctic Adventures: Tales from the Lives of Inuit Artists. Raquel Rivera, illustrated by Jirina Marton, $18.95 (ages 7-11)

The land, hunting, hunger, magic and extreme weather are themes that resonate for Inuit who live in the Far North. These stories, drawn from the lives of four Inuit artists, offer young readers a glimpse into this rich, remote culture, past and present. Accompanying each story are illustrations by Jirina Marton, who has spent time in the Arctic and whose deep appreciation for its subtle beauty shines through her art. In addition to the stories, there is a feature spread on each artist with a photograph, a brief biography and a reproduction of one of the artist's works.


Arctic Peoples. Robin Doak, $12.95 (grades 3-6)

This title teaches readers about the first people to live in the Arctic region of North America. It discusses their culture, customs, ways of life, interactions with other settlers, and their lives today.

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Aski Awasis / Children of the Earth: First Peoples Speaking on Adoption. Edited by Jeannine Carrière, $18.95

The adoption of Aboriginal children into non-Aboriginal families has a long and contentious history in Canada. Life stories told by First Nations people reveal that the adoption experience has been far from positive for these communities and has, in fact, been an integral aspect of colonization. In an effort to decolonize adoption practices, the Yellowhead Tribal Services Agency (YTSA) in Alberta has integrated customary First Peoples’ adoption practices with provincial adoption laws and regulations. Introducing this unique agency, the authors outline the history of First Nations adoptions and, through an interview with a YTSA Elder, describe the adoption ceremonies offered at YTSA. Themes that emerged from interviews with adoptive parents and youth who have been adopted through this new integrated practice are also explored, and important recommendations for policy and practice in First Nations adoption are offered.


Canoe Kids Volume 2: The Haida of Haida Gwaii. Canoe Kids, $19.95

Authentic indigenous voices take you on extraordinary explorations of learning about the world's Indigenous peoples. Learn about and from knowledgeable voices that promote understanding of

Mother Earth, cultural diversity... and have fun too!


Canoe Kids Volume 3: The Mi'Kmaq of Ktaqamkuk. Canoe Kids, $22.95

This third Volume focuses on the Mi'kmaq located in Newfoundland. Articles include background about the Mi'kmaq of the North Atlantic Shores; Canoes; Harvesting Foods; and Respecting Mother Earth in Newfoundland. Throughout the text the editor has included colourful photographs of the geography, people, and animals living in Newfoundland. Canoe Kids stresses the importance of traditional knowledge and the importance of the environment for all of Mother Earth's children and the Mi'kmaq issue acknowledges this connection in keeping Turtle Island vibrant and thriving for all the faces yet to come.

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Celebrating the Powwow. Bobbie Kalman, $8.95 (ages 5-8)

Each year, powwows are celebrated by many thousands of Native North Americans who come together from many different tribes. This book introduces children to the people and traditions that make up the powwow. Other topics include: 

  • powwow costumes
  • dance competitions
  • traditional music and instruments

Children of the Broken Treaty: Canada's Lost Promise and One Girl's Dream. Charlie Angus, $27.95

Children of the Broken Treaty exposes a system of apartheid in Canada that led to the largest youth-driven human rights movement in the country’s history. The movement was inspired by Shannen Koostachin. All Shannen wanted was a decent education. She found an ally in Charlie Angus, who had no idea she was going to change his life and inspire others to change the country.  

Based on extensive documentation assembled from Freedom of Information requests, Angus establishes a dark, unbroken line that extends from the policies of John A. Macdonald to the government of today. He provides chilling insight into how Canada — through breaches of treaties, broken promises, and callous neglect — deliberately denied First Nations children their basic human rights.


A Children's Guide to Arctic Birds. Mia Pelletier, illustrated by Danny Christopher, $16.95 (ages 8+)

With a simple layout and easy-to-follow format, this beautiful book introduces young readers to a dozen birds that call the Arctic home. From the Long-tailed Duck and the Red-throated Loon to the Snowy Owl and the Rock Ptarmigan, this picture book features migratory birds as well as those that live in the Arctic year-round and is filled with fun, useful facts, including where to look for eggs and nests during the short Arctic summer and how to recognize each bird’s call. Northern-specific elements, such as Inuktitut names for various birds and migratory patterns told from an Arctic perspective, are also included.

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Dancing On Our Turtle's Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation Resurgence and a New Emergence. Leanne Simpson, $19.95

Many promote Reconciliation as a “new” way for Canada to relate to Indigenous Peoples. In Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence activist, editor, and educator Leanne Betasamosake Simpson asserts reconciliation must be grounded in political resurgence and must support the regeneration of Indigenous languages, oral cultures, and traditions of governance. Simpson explores philosophies and pathways of regeneration, resurgence, and a new emergence through the Nishnaabeg language, Creation Stories, walks with Elders and children, celebrations and protests, and meditations on these experiences. She stresses the importance of illuminating Indigenous intellectual traditions to transform their relationship to the Canadian state.

Challenging and original, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back provides a valuable new perspective on the struggles of Indigenous Peoples.


The Delta is My Home. Tom McLeod & Mindy Willett, photographs by Tessa Macintosh, $16.95 (ages 5-10)

Vivid, beautiful photos tell the story of the diverse lands and cultures of Canada’s Northwest Territories share real stories of everyday life in the North.


Dreaming in Indian: Contemporary Native Voices. Edited by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale, $14.95  (ages 13+)

A powerful and visually stunning anthology from some of the most groundbreaking Native artists working in North America today. Truly universal in its themes, Dreaming In Indian will shatter commonly held stereotypes and challenge readers to rethink their own place in the world. Emerging and established Native artists, including acclaimed author Joseph Boyden, renowned visual artist Bunky Echo Hawk, and stand-up comedian Ryan McMahon, contribute thoughtful and heartfelt pieces on their experiences growing up Indigenous, expressing them through such mediums as art, food, the written word, sport, dance, and fashion.

Whether addressing the effects of residential schools, calling out bullies through personal manifestos, or simply citing hopes for the future, Dreaming In Indian refuses to shy away from difficult topics. Insightful, thought-provoking, and beautifully honest, this book will to appeal to young adult readers.

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Fatty Legs: a True Story. Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, $12.95 (ages 9-12)

Eight-year-old Margaret Pokiak has set her sights on learning to read, even though it means leaving her village in the high Arctic. Faced with unceasing pressure, her father finally agrees to let her make the five-day journey to attend school, but he warns Margaret of the terrors of residential schools.

At school Margaret soon encounters the Raven, a black-cloaked nun with a hooked nose and bony fingers that resemble claws. She immediately dislikes the strong-willed young Margaret. Intending to humiliate her, the heartless Raven gives gray stockings to all the girls — all except Margaret, who gets red ones. In an instant Margaret is the laughingstock of the entire school. In the face of such cruelty, Margaret refuses to be intimidated and bravely gets rid of the stockings. Although a sympathetic nun stands up for Margaret, in the end it is this brave young girl who gives the Raven a lesson in the power of human dignity.

Complemented by archival photos from Margaret Pokiak-Fenton’s collection and striking artworks from Liz Amini-Holmes, this inspiring first-person account of a plucky girl’s determination to confront her tormentor will linger with young readers.


Games of Survival: Traditional Inuit Games for Elementary Students. Johnny Issaluk, $12.95 

Traditionally, Inuit played games in order to be physically and mentally prepared for freezing weather, strenuous hunts, and other grueling conditions that made survival difficult. In this book, Arctic Winter Games champion Johnny Issaluk explains the basics of agility, strength, and endurance games. Through straightforward text and vibrant photographs, this resource brings to life this vital aspect of Inuit knowledge and culture.


Great Women from Our First Nations. Kelly Fournel, $10.95 (ages 9-13)

From heroines of the past to women making history today, GREAT WOMEN FROM OUR FIRST NATIONS reminds readers of the extraordinary contributions of First Nations women to our culture, history and daily lives.

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Hiawatha and the Peacemaker.  Robbie Robertson, $23.95

Born of Mohawk and Cayuga descent, musical icon Robbie Robertson learned the story of Hiawatha and his spiritual guide, the Peacemaker, as part of the Iroquois oral tradition. Hiawatha was a strong and articulate Mohawk who was chosen to translate the Peacemaker’s message of unity for the five warring Iroquois nations during the 14th century. This message not only succeeded in uniting the tribes but also forever changed how the Iroquois governed themselves — a blueprint for democracy that would later inspire the authors of the U.S. Constitution.

Caldecott Honor-winning illustrator David Shannon brings the journey of Hiawatha and the Peacemaker to life with arresting oil paintings. Together, Robertson and Shannon have crafted a new children’s classic that will both educate and inspire readers of all ages. Includes a CD featuring a new, original song written and performed by Robbie Robertson.


The Honour Drum: Sharing the Beauty of Canada's Indigenous People with Children, Families and Classrooms. Cheryl Bear & Tim Huff, $12.95

The Honour Drum is a uniquely envisioned and crafted project shared between two Canadian friends — an Indigenous woman from the west coast and a non-Indigenous man from Ontario — to reach children, families and classrooms across Canada and around the world with a message of great beauty and truth that should not be ignored. This vibrant book is an important starting place for learning and insight that are vital and, for many people of all ages, overdue. The Honour Drum is a love letter to the Indigenous people of Canada and a humble bow to Indigenous cultures around the world.


Indigenous Healing Psychology: Honoring the Wisdom of the First Peoples. Richard Katz, $37.50

Wherever the first inhabitants of the world gathered together, they engaged in the human concerns of community building, interpersonal relations, and spiritual understanding. As such these earliest people became our “first psychologists.” Their wisdom lives on through the teachings of contemporary Indigenous elders and healers, offering unique insights and practices to help us revision the self-limiting approaches of modern psychology and enhance the processes of healing and social justice.

Reconnecting psychology to its ancient roots, Richard Katz, Ph.D., sensitively shares the healing wisdom of Indigenous peoples he has worked with, including the Ju/’hoansi of the Kalahari Desert, Fijians native to the Fiji Islands, Lakota people of the Rosebud Reservation, and Cree and Anishnabe First Nations people from Saskatchewan. Through stories about the profoundly spiritual ceremonies and everyday practices he engaged in, he seeks to fulfill the responsibility he was given: build a foundation of reciprocity so Indigenous teachings can create a path toward healing psychology. Also drawing on his experience as a Harvard-trained psychologist, the author reveals how modern psychological approaches focus too heavily on labels and categories and fail to recognize the benefits of enhanced states of consciousness.

Exploring the vital role of spirituality in the practice of psychology, Katz explains how the Indigenous approach offers a way to understand challenges and opportunities, from inside lived truths, and treat mental illness at its source. Acknowledging the diversity of Indigenous approaches, he shows how Indigenous perspectives can help create a more effective model of best practices in psychology as well as guide us to a more holistic existence where we can once again assume full responsibility in the creation of our lives.

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The Inuit Thought of It: Amazing Arctic Innovations. Allotook Ipellie & David MacDonald, $9.95

For hundreds of years the Inuit used their ingenuity to make their home in one of the harshest environments on Earth — the Arctic. The Inuit Thought of It explores more than 40 ideas crucial to that survival. From items familiar to us today (like kayaks and parkas) to inventive concepts that changed their lives (including games and the iconic Inuksuk), this book celebrates the creativity of a remarkably resourceful people.


An Inuksuk Means Welcome. Mary Wallace, $18.95

An inuksuk is a stone landmark that different peoples of the Arctic region build to leave a symbolic message. Inuksuit (the plural of inuksuk) can point the way, express joy, or simply say: welcome. A central image in Inuit culture, the inuksuk frames this picture book as an acrostic: readers will learn seven words from the Inuktitut language whose first letters together spell INUKSUK. Each word is presented in English and in Inuktitut characters, with phonetic pronunciation guides provided.

The words and their definitions give a sense of the traditions and customs of Inuit life in the Arctic: nanuq is the powerful polar bear of the north; kamik is a warm seal- and caribou-skin boot; and siku is sea ice. Stunning paintings with deep color and rich texture evoke a powerful sense of place and show great respect for the Arctic's indigenous people. Extra informational text features include an introductory note about the significance of inuksuit in Inuit culture and a nonfiction page that profiles seven different types of inuksuit.

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Invisible North: the Search for Answers On a Troubled Reserve. Alexandra Shimo, $24.99

When freelance journalist Alexandra Shimo arrives in Kashechewan, a fly-in, northern Ontario reserve, to investigate rumours of a fabricated water crisis and document its deplorable living conditions, she finds herself drawn into the troubles of the reserve. Unable to cope with the desperate conditions, she begins to fall apart.

A moving tribute to the power of hope and resilience, Invisible North is an intimate portrait of a place that pushes everyone to their limits. Part memoir, part history of the Canadian reserves, Shimo offers an expansive exploration and unorthodox take on many of the First Nation issues that dominate the news today, including the suicide crises, murdered and missing indigenous women and girls, Treaty rights, Native sovereignty, and deep poverty.


The Kids Book of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada. Diane Silvey, Illustrated by John Mantha, $14.95 (ages 9-14)

Canada's Aboriginal peoples have shaped this country in countless ways. Their story is central to the nation's identity — indeed, the word "Canada" is derived from the Huron-Haudenosaunee word "kanata," which means "our village."

This book is a balanced, in-depth look at the cultures, struggles and triumphs of Canada's first peoples. Exhaustively researched and reviewed by specialists in the field, this groundbreaking book is by far the most comprehensive of its kind. The detailed illustrations based on museum artifacts, written records of long ago and contemporary scholarship help bring the traditional ways to life for young readers. 


Life Stages and Native Women: Memory, Teachings, and Story Medicine. Kim Anderson, $27.95

A rare and inspiring guide to the health and well-being of Aboriginal women and their communities.

The process of “digging up medicines” — of rediscovering the stories of the past — serves as a powerful healing force in the decolonization and recovery of Aboriginal communities. In Life Stages and Native Women, Kim Anderson shares the teachings of fourteen elders from the Canadian prairies and Ontario to illustrate how different life stages were experienced by Métis, Cree, and Anishinaabe girls and women during the mid-twentieth century. These elders relate stories about their own lives, the experiences of girls and women of their childhood communities, and customs related to pregnancy, birth, post-natal care, infant and child care, puberty rites, gender and age-specific work roles, the distinct roles of post-menopausal women, and women’s roles in managing death. Through these teachings, we learn how evolving responsibilities from infancy to adulthood shaped women’s identities and place within Indigenous society, and were integral to the health and well-being of their communities.

By understanding how healthy communities were created in the past, Anderson explains how this traditional knowledge can be applied toward rebuilding healthy Indigenous communities today.

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Listening to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in Contemporary Society. Edited by Carries Bourassa, Elder Betty McKenna & Darlene Juschka, $29.95

Listening to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in a Contemporary Society is a collection of stories, inspired by a wealth of experiences across space and time from a kokum, an auntie, two-spirit parents, a Metis mother, a Tlinglit/Anishnabe Métis mother and an allied feminist mother. This book is born out of the need to share experiences and story. Storytelling is one of the most powerful forms of passing on teachings and values that we have in our Indigenous communities. This book weaves personal stories to explore mothering practices and examines historical contexts and underpinnings that contribute to contemporary parenting practices. We share our stories with the hope that it will resonate with readers whether they are in the classroom or in the community. Like our contributors, we are from all walks of life, sharing diverse perspectives about mothering whether it be as a mother, auntie, kokum or other adopted role.


Magic Weapons: Aboriginal Writers Remaking Community after Residential School. Sam McKegney, $28.95 

The legacy of the residential school system ripples throughout Native Canada, its fingerprints on the domestic violence, poverty, alcoholism, drug abuse, and suicide rates that continue in many Native communities. Magic Weapons is the first major survey of Indigenous writings in response to the residential school system, and... examines the ways in which Indigenous survivors of residential school mobilize narrative in their struggles for personal and communal empowerment in the shadow of attempted cultural genocide. Editor Sam McKegney argues that Indigenous life writings are culturally generative in ways that go beyond disclosure and recompense, re-envisioning what it means to live and write as Indigenous individuals in post-residential-school Canada.


MINGAN My Village: Poems by Innu Schoolchildren. Illustrated by Rogé, $14.95 (ages 7-11)

Illustrator Rogé visited a school in Mingan, an Innu village in northeastern Quebec. He spent a few days taking the time to photograph each child. Once he returned home to his studio, brush in hand, he revisited the eyes of these children and drew their portraits. MINGAN My Village is a collection of fifteen faces, and fifteen poems written by young Innu. Given a platform to be heard, the children chose to transport readers far away from the difficulties and problems related to their realities to see the beauty that surrounds them in nature.

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The Mishomis Book: the Voice of the Ojibway. Edward Benton-Banai, $30.95

In The Mishomis Book, Edward Benton-Banai documents the history, traditions, and culture of the Ojibway people through stories passed down through generations. For readers from all cultures — but especially for Ojibway and Native youth — The Mishomis Book provides an introduction to Ojibway culture and the sacred Midewiwin teachings, aiming to protect this knowledge by instilling its importance in a new generation.

Bawdwaywidun, or Edward Benton-Banai, is a full blood Ojibwe-Anishinabe of the Fish Clan from the Odawazawguh i gunning or Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation in the beautiful northern Wisconsin. A strong advocate for culture-based education and the relearning of the sacred Anishinabemowin language, Benton-Banai is the presiding Grand Chief of the Three Fires Midewiwin Lodge.


Mothers of the Nations: Indigenous Mothering as Global Resistance. Edited by Kim Anderson, D. Memee Lavell-Harvard, $39.95

The voices of Indigenous women world-wide have long been silenced by colonial oppression and institutions of patriarchal dominance. Recent generations of powerful Indigenous women have begun speaking out so that their positions of respect within their families and communities might be reclaimed.

This volume explores issues surrounding and impacting Indigenous mothering, family and community in a variety of contexts inter­nationally. It addresses diverse subjects, including child welfare, employing Indigenous mothering curriculum for healing, mothers and traditional foods, intergenerational mothering in the wake of residential schooling, mothering and HIV, urban Indigenous mothering, mothering adopted children, two spirited mothering, Indigenous midwifery, and more.


My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell. Arthur Bear Chief, $19.95

My Decade at Old Sun, My Lifetime of Hell is a simple and outspoken account of the sexual and psychological abuse that Arthur Bear Chief suffered during his time at Old Sun Residential school in Gleichen on the Siksika Nation. In a series of chronological vignettes, Bear Chief depicts the punishment, cruelty, abuse, and injustice that he endured at Old Sun and then later relived in the traumatic process of retelling his story at an examination for discovery in connection with a lawsuit brought against the federal government.

He returned to Gleichen late in life — to the home left to him by his mother — and it was there that he began to reconnect with Blackfoot language and culture and to write his story. Although the terrific adversity Bear Chief faced in his childhood made an indelible mark on his life, his unyielding spirit is evident throughout his story.

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A Native American Thought of It: Amazing Inventions and Innovations. Rocky Landon & David MacDonald, $9.95

Everyone knows that moccasins, canoes and toboggans were invented by the Aboriginal people of North America, but did you know that they also developed their own sign language, syringe needles and a secret ingredient in soda pop? Depending on where they lived, Aboriginal communities relied on their ingenuity to harness the resources available to them. Some groups, such as the Iroquois, were particularly skilled at growing and harvesting food. From them, we get corn and wild rice, as well as maple syrup. Other groups, including the Sioux and Comanche of the plains, were exceptional hunters. Camouflage, fish hooks, and decoys were all developed to make the task of catching animals easier. And even games — lacrosse, hockey and volleyball — have Native American roots. With descriptive photos and information-packed text, this book explores eight different categories in which the creativity of First Nations peoples from across the continent led to remarkable inventions and innovations, many of which are still in use today.


The Native Stories from Keepers of the Animals, Told by Joseph Bruchac. Michael Caduto & Joseph Bruchac, $14.95

Perennial favourites with educators, the bestselling "Keepers" series presents environmental issues from a Native perspective.


No Borders. Darla Evyagotailak & Mindy Willett, photographs by Tessa Macintosh, $19.95 

With vivid, beautiful photos, these books about the diverse lands and cultures of Canada’s Northwest Territories share real stories of everyday life in the North.

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#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women. Edited by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale, $14.95

Native women demand to be heard in this stunning anthology.

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous girls and women across North America resound in this book. In the same visual style as the bestselling Dreaming in Indian, #NotYourPrincess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, intergenerational trauma, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women demanding change and realizing their dreams. Sometimes outraged, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have had their history hidden and whose modern lives have been virtually invisible.


Pathways for Remembering and Recognizing Indigenous Thought in Education: Philosophies of Iethi'nihsténha Ohwentsia'kékha (Land). Sandra Styres, $27.95

Indigenous scholars have been gathering, speaking, and writing about Indigenous knowledge for decades. These knowledges are grounded in ancient traditions and very old pedagogies that have been woven with the tangled strings and chipped beads of colonial relations.

Pathways for Remembering and Recognizing Indigenous Thought in Education is an exploration into some of the shared cross-cultural themes that inform and shape Indigenous thought and Indigenous educational philosophy. These philosophies generate tensions, challenges, and contradictions that can become very tangled and messy when considered within the context of current educational systems that reinforce colonial power relations. Sandra Styres shows how Indigenous thought can inform decolonizing approaches in education as well as the possibilities for truly transformative teaching practices. This book offers new pathways for remembering, conceptualizing and understanding these ancient knowledges and philosophies within a twenty-first century educational context.


Proud to Be Inuvialuit. James Pokiak & Mindy Willett, $16.95 

James Popiak grew up on the land, near the shores of the Arctic Sea. Join James and his family and learn about how the beluga whale is interlinked with Inuvialuit culture and history and learn about the traditional values and skills of his people.

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Read Listen Tell: Indigenous Stories from Turtle Island. Sophie McCall, Deanna Reder, David Gaertner & Gabrielle L'Hirondelle Hill, Editors, $38.99

Read Listen Tell brings together an extraordinary range of Indigenous stories from across Turtle Island (North America). From short fiction to as-told-to narratives, from illustrated stories to personal essays, these stories celebrate the strength of heritage and the liveliness of innovation. Ranging in tone from humorous to defiant to triumphant, the stories explore core concepts in Indigenous literary expression, such as the relations between land, language, and community, the variety of narrative forms, and the continuities between oral and written forms of expression. Rich in insight and bold in execution, the stories proclaim the diversity, vitality, and depth of Indigenous writing.

Building on two decades of scholarly work to centre Indigenous knowledges and perspectives, the book transforms literary method while respecting and honouring Indigenous histories and peoples of these lands. It includes stories by acclaimed writers like Thomas King, Sherman Alexie, Paula Gunn Allen, and Eden Robinson, a new generation of emergent writers, and writers and storytellers who have often been excluded from the canon, such as French- and Spanish-language Indigenous authors, Indigenous authors from Mexico, Chicana/o authors, Indigenous-language authors, works in translation, and “lost“ or underappreciated texts.

In a place and time when Indigenous people often have to contend with representations that marginalize or devalue their intellectual and cultural heritage, this collection is a testament to Indigenous resilience and creativity. It shows that the ways in which we read, listen, and tell play key roles in how we establish relationships with one another, and how we might share knowledges across cultures, languages, and social spaces.


A Recognition of Being: Reconstructing Native Womanhood. Kim Anderson, $44.95

How are Native women defined? How has this sense of identity been influenced by European culture, and how have negative images been resisted? These are only a few of the questions Cree/Metis writer Kim Anderson addresses in this important book based on interviews with forty Native women from across Canada.

Starting from the role of women in Indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans, Anderson explores how female identity and power were systematically dismantled through colonization. Drawing on their own experiences, Native women describe how they are reclaiming their cultural traditions, and creating positive and powerful images of themselves which are true to their heritage. A Recognition of Being is a critical and inspiring history of Native womanhood. Features:

  • based on interviews with forty Aboriginal women from across Canada and the author’s own personal journey as a Native woman
  • explores the central question of how Aboriginal women maintain power and construct a positive knowledge of the self
  • contributes to a growing body of scholarship on Indigenous women’s resistance to oppression

Residential Schools and Reconciliation: Canada Confronts Its History. J. R. Miller, $39.95

Since the 1980s successive Canadian institutions, including the federal government and Christian churches, have attempted to grapple with the malignant legacy of residential schooling, including official apologies, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). In Residential Schools and Reconciliation, award winning author J. R. Miller tackles and explains these institutional responses to Canada’s residential school legacy. Analysing archival material and interviews with former students, politicians, bureaucrats, church officials, and the Chief Commissioner of the TRC, Miller reveals a major obstacle to achieving reconciliation – the inability of Canadians at large to overcome their flawed, overly positive understanding of their country’s history.

This unique, timely, and provocative work asks Canadians to accept that the root of the problem was Canadians like them in the past who acquiesced to aggressively assimilative policies.

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Residential Schools: with Words and Images of Survivors. Larry Loyie, with Wayne Spear & Constance Brissenden, $35.95 

This book explains the hidden history of the residential school system. Award-winning author and former residential school student Larry Loyie delves into how Canada, for over a century, removed more than 150,000 Aboriginal children from their families to attend these church-run residential schools. It explains in a comprehensive, yet accessible, way the history of not only First Nations people but also the Métis and Inuit peoples of Canada.

Residential Schools speaks with the voice of more than 70 former students and family members. There are more than 125 images — many from the personal collections of survivors, a map of Canada’s residential schools, a “key dates” timeline, five myths associated with Residential School and a glossary of terms. The book involved over 20 years of research, 200 interviews and took three years to write. “It is a historical narrative and national history that needs to be told,” said author Larry Loyie.


Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools — the Devastating Impact on Canada's Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Findings and Calls for Action. Melanie Florence, $34.95 (Ages 13-18+)

Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history.

Over a period of close 150 years, about 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation.

Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.

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The Secret of Your Name. David Bouchard, $24.95 (ages 10 and up)

Canada's Métis are the only mixed blood people in the world recognized by every level of government as being a Nation. The Métis have their own language, flag, songs and stories. They have exciting traditions and a proud history. Sadly, their journey was one of hardships, denial and often lies. In The Secret of Your Name, these three men open their hearts to all those who care to know what it means when it is said that we are Proud to be Métis! This spectacular book will appeal to any and all who have an interest in Canada's aboriginal people. It will call out to art collectors, musicians and all who have ever pondered their own past. Included on the accompanying CD, with reading in English/French and Michif, is the Red River Jig performed by acclaimed Master Métis Fiddler John Arcand.


Secret Path. Gord Downie & Jeff Lemire, $26.99

Secret Path tells the story of Chanie “Charlie” Wenjack, a twelve-year-old boy who died in flight from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School fifty years ago. Chanie, misnamed Charlie by his teachers, was a young boy who died on October 22, 1966, walking the railroad tracks, trying to escape from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School to return home. Chanie’s home was 400 miles away. He didn’t know that. He didn’t know where it was, nor how to find it, but, like so many kids — more than anyone will be able to imagine — he tried.

Chanie’s story is Canada’s story. We are not the country we thought we were. History will be re-written. We are all accountable. Secret Path acknowledges a dark part of Canada’s history — the long suppressed mistreatment of Indigenous children and families by the residential school system — with the hope of starting our country on a road to reconciliation.

Proceeds from Secret Path will be donated to The Gord Downie Secret Path Fund for Truth and Reconciliation via The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) at The University of Manitoba.


Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths In a Northern City. Tanya Talaga, $22.95

In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied.

More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the minus twenty degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water.

Using a sweeping narrative focusing on the lives of the students, award-winning investigative journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this small northern city that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities.

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Strong Helpers' Teachings: the Value of Indigenous Knowledges in the Helping Professions, 2nd Edition. Cyndy Baskin, $54.95

Timely and accessible, Strong Helpers’ Teachings skillfully illustrates the importance of Indigenous knowledges for students, practitioners, and scholars in the human services. Making space for the voices of many Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars, practitioners, and service users, Cyndy Baskin’s text models possible pathways towards relationship building and allyship. Placing Indigenous concerns and perspectives at the centre of social work disciplines, and through the use of examples and case studies, Baskin covers topics such as spirituality, research, justice, and healing.

This thoroughly updated edition includes new chapters on self-care for helpers, holistic approaches to mental health, and two-spirit experiences and is a valuable resource for those interested in sharing, listening, and teaching Indigenous worldviews and helping practices.


Turtle Island: the Story of North America's First People. Eldon Yellowhorn & Kathy Lowinger, $16.95

Unlike most books on the history of Native peoples, which begin with the arrival of Europeans in 1492, this book goes back to the Ice Age to give young readers a glimpse of what life was like pre-contact. The title, Turtle Island, refers to a Native myth that explains how the Americas were formed on the back of a turtle. Based on archeological finds and scientific research, we now have a clearer picture of how the Indigenous peoples lived as far back as fourteen thousand years ago. A wide variety of topics are explored including what people ate, how they expressed themselves through art, and how they adapted to their surroundings. The importance of storytelling among the Native peoples is always present to shed light on how they explained their world: each chapter opens with a seminal myth to address a different theme. With its striking design and beautiful images, this book fills a gap in the history of our Indigenous peoples.


UNIKKAAQATIGIIT: Arctic Weather and Climate through the Eyes of Nunavut’s Children. Edited by David Natcher, Mary Ellen Thomas & Neil Christopher, $12.95 

Compiled from writing, poetry, and illustrations created by young Nunavummiut, this anthology explores diverse aspects of the theme of weather — from Inuit mythology to traditional knowledge, climate change, and daily survival. Through full-colour illustrations and engaging stories and poetry written both in Inuktituit and English, learn more about the vital force of Arctic weather as seen through the eyes of children.

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Until Our Hearts are On the Ground: Aboriginal Mothering, Oppression, Resistance, and Rebirth. D. Memee Lavell-Harvard & Jeannette Corbiere Lavell, Editors, $29.95

In this revolutionary volume, as part of their overall effort to advocate for the rights of Aboriginal women, D. Memee Lavell-Harvard and Jeannette Corbiere Lavell have brought together a multitude of voices to speak on the issues facing Aboriginal mothers in contemporary society. Beginning with an examination of the experience of childbirth the contributing authors illustrate its potential as a source of empowerment and revitalization for our nations.

Through their own unique perspectives, the women bring us to an understanding of the variety of Aboriginal mothering practices, the impacts of colonization and government legislation on Aboriginal mothers, and literary representations of Aboriginal mothering. Together, these women have worked to reveal not only the connection between the longstanding historical oppression experienced by Aboriginal women and the dire contemporary circumstances of many Aboriginal communities, but also the power of Aboriginal mothers to revitalize and transform our communities. They are truly the givers of new life.


Urban Tribes: Native Americans in the City. Edited by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale, $14.95

Much of the popular discourse on Native Americans and Aboriginals focuses on reservation life. But the majority of Natives in North America live off the rez. How do they stay rooted to their culture? How do they connect with their community? Urban Tribes offers unique insight into this growing and often misperceived group. Emotionally potent and visually arresting, the anthology profiles young urban Natives from across North America, exploring how they connect with Native culture and values in their contemporary lives. Their stories are as diverse as they are. From a young Dene woman pursuing a MBA at Stanford to a Pima photographer in Phoenix to a Mohawk actress in New York, these urban Natives share their unique perspectives to bridge the divide between their past and their future, their cultural home, and their adopted cities.

Unflinchingly honest and deeply moving, contributors explore a wide-range of topics. From the trials and tribulations of dating in the city to the alienating experience of leaving a remote reserve to attend high school in the city, from the mainstream success of Electric Pow Wow music to the humiliation of dealing with racist school mascots, personal perspectives illuminate larger political issues. An innovative and highly visual design offers a dynamic, reading experience.


Uumajut: Learn About Arctic Wildlife. Simon Awa, Anna Ziegler, & Stephanie McDonald, Leah Otak & Romi Caron, $9.95 (ages 4-8) 

Learn fun facts and traditional Inuit knowledge about Arctic animals. This beautifully illustrated book takes readers from tundra to sea ice, to teach children about a wide variety of animals, from caribou to belugas.  This rare look at the Canadian North showcases a fascinating ecosystem we often forget is a large part of our country.

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We Feel Good Out Here. Julie-Anne André & Mindy Willett, photographs by Tessa Macintosh, $16.95 

Vivid, beautiful photos tell the story of the diverse lands and cultures of Canada’s Northwest Territories share real stories of everyday life in the North.


Why Indigenous Literatures Matter. Daniel Heath Justice, $19.99

Part survey of the field of Indigenous literary studies, part cultural history, and part literary polemic, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter asserts the vital significance of literary expression to the political, creative, and intellectual efforts of Indigenous peoples today. In considering the connections between literature and lived experience, this book contemplates four key questions at the heart of Indigenous kinship traditions: How do we learn to be human? How do we become good relatives? How do we become good ancestors? How do we learn to live together?

Blending personal narrative and broader historical and cultural analysis with close readings of key creative and critical texts, Justice argues that Indigenous writers engage with these questions in part to challenge settler-colonial policies and practices that have targeted Indigenous connections to land, history, family, and self. More importantly, Indigenous writers imaginatively engage the many ways that communities and individuals have sought to nurture these relationships and project them into the future.

This provocative volume challenges readers to critically consider and rethink their assumptions about Indigenous literature, history, and politics while never forgetting the emotional connections of our shared humanity and the power of story to effect personal and social change. Written with a generalist reader firmly in mind, but addressing issues of interest to specialists in the field, this book welcomes new audiences to Indigenous literary studies while offering more seasoned readers a renewed appreciation for these transformative literary traditions.

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Wisdom from Our First Nations: a First Nations Book for Young Readers. Kim Sigafus & Lyle Ernst, $10.95

In Indigenous cultures, elders serve as a bridge across time: they are connected to the past, they live in the present and they offer wisdom for the future. In these fascinating biographical essays, twelve First Nation and Native American elders share stories from their lives and tell what it was like to live in a time before television, cell phones and video games. Their stories explain how their humble childhoods shaped the adults they became and the lessons they share as elders. All the elders profiled work to ensure that their Native culture is passed down to members of their tribe. Settle in with this book and “listen” to the stories of these elders’ lives. As you take in their history, you just might gain wisdom that could make a difference in your own life.


Wícihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada. Gord Bruyere (Amawaajibitang), Michael Anthony Hart (Kaskitémahikan) & Raven Sinclair (Ótiskewápíwskew), $39.00

Wícihitowin is the first Canadian social work book written by First Nations, Inuit and Métis authors who are educators at schools of social work across Canada. The book begins by presenting foundational theoretical perspectives that develop an understanding of the history of colonization and theories of decolonization and Indigenist social work. It goes on to explore issues and aspects of social work practice with Indigenous people to assist educators, researchers, students and practitioners to create effective and respectful approaches to social work with diverse populations. Traditional Indigenous knowledge that challenges and transforms the basis of social work with Indigenous and other peoples comprises a third section of the book. Wícihitowin concludes with an eye to the future, which the authors hope will continue to promote the innovations and creativity presented in this groundbreaking work.


You Make the Difference in Helping Your Child Learn. Ayala Manolson et al, $24.95 (available in Aboriginal edition)

The You Make the Difference guidebook provides you with simple techniques for taking the everyday activities you already do with your child and making small, but powerful adjustments to the way you interact with him. Having dinner, taking a bath, reading a book — all of these routines can be opportunities to encourage your child and let him know you are paying close attention to what he has to say. If your child knows you’re interested, he’ll be more likely to continue the interaction and add his own ideas, giving him more opportunities to learn.

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